Courses for Spring 2024

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
ANTH 0030-601 Human Origins, Evolution and Diversity Deborah I Olszewski MUSE 345 TR 5:15 PM-6:44 PM How did humans evolve? When did humans start to walk on two legs? How are humans related to non-human primates? This course focuses on the scientific study of human evolution describing the emergence, development, and diversification of our species, Homo sapiens. As a starting point, we discuss the conceptual framework of evolutionary theory as well as basic genetics and heredity as they relate to human morphological, physiological, and genetic variation. We then examine what studies of nonhuman primates (monkeys and apes) can reveal about our own evolutionary past, reviewing the behavioral and ecological diversity seen among living primates. We conclude the course examining the "hard" evidence of human evolution - the fossil and material culture record of human history from our earliest primate ancestors to the emergence of modern Homo sapiens - and also explore the new insights into modern human origins and dispersal provided by genetic studies. We will further examine the nature of human biological variation and discuss the history of scientific racism in physical anthropology. As part of this course, you will have the opportunity, during recitations, to conduct hands-on exercises collecting and analyzing behavioral, morphological, and genetic data on both humans and nonhuman primates and work with the Department of Anthropology's extensive collection of fossil casts. Living World Sector (all classes) https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=ANTH0030601
ANTH 0040-001 The Modern World and Its Cultural Background Kevin M Burke MUSE B17 MW 10:15 AM-11:14 AM An introduction to the diversity of cultures in the world. This course is divided into two parts. The first briefly examines different models of understanding human diversity: ethnicities, religions, languages, political forms, economic structures, cultures, and "civilizations". Students will learn to think about the world as an interconnected whole, and know the significance of culture on a global scale. The second part is an introduction to area studies, in which we undertake a survey of the different regions of the world. We conduct the survey paying attention to the different aspects of human diversities, which we examine in the first part of this course. Students will acquire a greater appreciation and understanding of cultural differences in the more comprehensive social context. Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only)
ANTH 0050-001 Great Transformations Deborah I Olszewski FAGN 216 TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course explores the history and archaeology of the last 20,000 years from the development of agriculture to the industrial revolution. Why did people across the world abandon foraging for farming? How and why did cities and states develop? Why did societies succeed or fail? How have humans transformed themselves and the natural world, including the landscape and the climate? We will explore the methods that archaeologists use to consider these questions and analyze evidence for social and economic change from the Middle East, the Americas, Asia, Africa, Australia and Europe. In addition, students will have a chance to conduct hands-on exercises with artifacts from the Penn Museum during practicums. History & Tradition Sector (all classes) https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=ANTH0050001
ANTH 0058-301 Doing Research: First-Year Seminar Kamalini Hegde
Lisa A Mitchell
VANP 00 TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This interdisciplinary course introduces students to qualitative research methods and frameworks in the social sciences and humanities. The goals of the semester will be for each student to develop their own research proposal for a specific project that they could imagine pursuing over the summer or later in their undergraduate career,and to develop a web-based exhibit of one Penn-based research collection of interest. Students will be introduced to a range of textual, archival and media collections and databases available at Penn, with particular attention to South Asia and other specific regions of interest to course participants. The class will visit the Penn Musuem object collections and archives, the Art library, the Kislak Center for Rare Books and Manuscripts, Film Archives, and other special collections on campus, and meet with a representative from the Center for Undergraduate Research Funding (CURF). Students will learn how to frame an effective research question, situate it in relation to existing research, select the most appropriate methods for addressing the question, and develop an effective research plan. Each week students will be introduced to a new set of frameworks for analysis, see specific examples of their application drawn from anthropological, historical, and related scholarship and have opportunities to practice applying and evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of specific methodological tools. Students will also have the opportunity to identify sources of funding for summer research projects and prepare applications for these opportunities as part of the course. The course is ideal as an introduction to both the excellent libraries and research collections housed at Penn, and to a wide range of intellectual frameworks for engaging with these collections - a great way to kick off your undergraduate experience at Penn! SAST0058301 Society sector (all classes)
ANTH 0063-401 East & West: A Hitchhiker's Guide to the Cultural History of the Modern World Lisa A Mitchell
Shrinidhi Narasimhan
Ameen Muhammed Perumannil Sidhick
FAGN 216 TR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM Sugar and Spices. Tea and Coffee. Opium and Cocaine. Hop aboard the Indian Ocean dhows, Chinese junks, Dutch schooners, and British and American clipper ships that made possible the rise of global capitalism, new colonial relationships, and the intensified forms of cultural change. How have the desires to possess and consume particular commodities shaped cultures and the course of modern history? This class introduces students to the cultural history of the modern world through an interdisciplinary analysis of connections between East and West, South and North. Following the circulation of commodities and the development of modern capitalism, the course examines the impact of global exchange on interactions and relationships between regions, nations, cultures, and peoples and the influences on cultural practices and meanings. The role of slavery and labor migrations, colonial and imperial relations, and struggles for economic and political independence are also considered. From the role of spices in the formation of European joint stock companies circa 1600 to the contemporary cocaine trade, the course's use of both original primary sources and secondary readings written by historians and anthropologists will enable particular attention to the ways that global trade has impacted social, cultural, and political formations and practices throughout the world. SAST0063401 Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only)
ANTH 0103-401 Origin and Culture of Cities Richard L Zettler FAGN 114 TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM The UN estimates that 2.9 of the world's 6.1 billion people live in cities and that this percentage is rapidly increasing in many parts of the world. This course examines urban life and urban problems by providing anthropological perspectives on this distinctive form of human association and land use. First we will examine the "origin" of cities, focusing on several of the places where cities first developed, including Mesopotamia and the Valley of Mexico. We will then investigate the internal structure of non-industrial cities by looking at case studies from around the world and from connections between the cities of the past and the city in which we live and work today. NELC0003401, URBS0003401 History & Tradition Sector (all classes)
ANTH 0330-001 Language, Society, and the Human Experience Andrew M. Carruthers MUSE 328 TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM Anthropology is the study of what it means to be human across space and time. In this introductory course, we explore how language is at the heart of what it means to be human, examining the constituting role of language in the human experience in societies across the globe. We address a number of questions: How is being a speaker being a member of a society? How do ways of speaking about the world shape ways of experiencing the world? What is linguistic diversity and why is it important? How does one's identity emerge through one's way of speaking? How are large-scale forces like globalization shaping languages and fashions of speaking around the world? Throughout, we explore how language reflects and shapes the ways in which human beings navigate the flux of everyday life.
ANTH 1020-401 Iraq: Ancient Cities and Empires Richard L Zettler EDUC 114 W 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Iraq: Ancient Cities and Empires is a chronological survey of the ancient civilization that existed in the drainage basin of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers from the early settled village farming communities of the 7th millennium BCE to the middle of the 1st millennium BCE, when Nebuchadnezzar II ruled Babylon and much of the Middle East. Though organized period by period, NELC 241 explores various social, political, economic, and ideological topics, exposing students to various strands of evidence, including settlement survey data, excavated architectural remains, artifacts, and documentary sources, as well as an eclectic mix of theoretical perspectives. The course aims to provide students with a strong foundation for the further study of the ancient and pre-modern Middle East. NELC1000401, NELC6020401, URBS1020401
ANTH 1310-401 Small Business Anthropology Gregory P Urban MUSE 345 R 1:45 PM-4:44 PM With a focus on minority-owned small businesses in the City of Philadelphia, this class will introduce students to the work of anthropologists who have made their careers in the business world using the tools they acquired through training in anthropology. By bringing anthropological perspectives into the workplace, business anthropologists seek to promote well-being for employees and owners, as well as consumers and the communities in which businesses operate. The class will also introduce students to Philadelphia from the point of view of minority owned small businesses. One of the two class days each week will focus on business anthropology as a profession and include readings on organizational culture, design anthropology, and the role of anthropologists in marketing and advertising, as well as in globalization processes and entrepreneurship. The second of the two days each week will focus on the city of Philadelphia and the role of small businesses within it. We will study the spatial layout of the city, the kinds of small businesses that are operative within the city and where they are located, the relationship of business to ethnicity, gentrification and its impact on small business, and the role of government and community groups in relationship to small businesses and their owners and employees. As part of the class, students will engage in guided research on specific small businesses, with the aim of developing an ethnographic understanding of the experiences of owners and employees, the opportunities they have seized upon and the problems they have confronted. We hope in the course of the semester to provide an ethnographic profile of a sampling of small businesses from different industries, which can in turn contribute to understanding larger social and cultural patterns within Philadelphia. Through a class blog or other means, we hope as well to contribute to the ability of minority small business owners to voice their experiences, as well as their fears and hopes for the future, to members of the University community and beyond. URBS1310401
ANTH 1430-001 Explorations in Human Biology Theodore G Schurr GLAB 101 MW 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course is an exploration of human biology from a biocultural and evolutionary perspective. The class will provide you with a better understanding of what it means to be human, how humans came to exhibit such a wide range variation, and what biological anthropology can contribute to your understanding of the world. In this class students will learn to integrate the theory and methods used in human biology research through lectures, assignments, and lab sessions. This course will explore topics including human genetics, growth and development, nutrition, disease, and reproduction. We will also use the course as an opportunity to introduce you to the important contributions of biological anthropologists to the study of race, inequality, sex and gender, and health among others. Nat Sci & Math Sector (new curriculum only)
ANTH 1490-301 Introduction to Native American and Indigenous Studies Tina P Fragoso MUSE 330 TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This course offers a broad introduction to evolving scholarship in the combined fields of Native American Studies and Indigenous Studies worldwide. Students will examine the various ways that Indigenous peoples and academic researchers are currently engaging with Indigenous knowledges, while also exploring the lingering impacts of settler colonialism and the influence of decolonizing methodologies. Students will gain foundational understandings of the cross-disciplinary nature of Native American and Indigenous Studies (NAIS), by studying theoretical interpretations of Indigenous peoples in academic and historical contexts, and by examining practical approaches to Indigenous research in diverse worldwide settings. Students will approach topics from a variety of disciplinary traditions, utilizing historical texts, ethnological studies, oral literature, material culture, and modern media, including websites and databases produced by and for Indigenous communities. Readings will include the work of researchers who bridge the disciplines of anthropology, history, folklore, art, law, science, etc. Students will watch a selection of films by Indigenous filmmakers, and attend lectures by a selection of Indigenous guest speakers. NAIS faculty advisors from various schools at Penn (e.g., School of Arts and Sciences, Education, Law, Nursing) will also present several guest lectures to highlight their unique experiences and research projects with Indigenous communities. Special case studies will focus on: new directions in collaborative research; issues in museum representation and repatriation; heritage site protection and Indigenous archaeology; legal interventions and protections for Indigenous rights; and innovative projects in language restoration and cultural recovery.
ANTH 1500-401 World Musics and Cultures Ryan L Tomski LERN 101 TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. Fulfills College Cross Cultural Foundational Requirement. AFRC1500401, MUSC1500401 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes)
ANTH 1530-001 Gifts, Commodities, and the Market: The Anthropology of the Economy Kevin M Burke MUSE 329 TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM What is the difference between a farmer's market in West Philadelphia and a bazaar in Cairo? What is the meaning of a gift between friends? What about gifts between enemies? What are the origins, meaning, and purpose of money? What is the relationship between politics and the economy? This course will begin to answer these questions by introducing the field of economic anthropology. The economy is not an isolated phenomenon: it is interconnected with socio-cultural and political factors, thus challenging our conception of what is truly considered to be economic. By highlighting the cultural diversity of economic systems across time and space, including our own contemporary, global economy, students will learn what can be considered natural about the economy, and what is contingent on historical factors of culture, society, or politics. Prior economic coursework is not required, nor will this course entail much quantitative analysis. This is not a course in traditional economics or finance. Instead, we will examine socio-cultural, historical, and biological aspects of different economic arrangements, and discuss how anthropological approaches to the economy draw from larger theoretical perspectives (e.g. Smithian, Marxian, Polanyian, Austrian, etc) Case studies will vary widely and include topics such as gift-giving economies of the South Pacific, power and redistribution of the European Bronze Age, social relationships among 21st century Wall-Street traders, and many others that highlight the diversity of economic practices among human societies. Students will be evaluated on short written responses to readings, a midterm and non-cumulative final exam, and a research paper.
ANTH 1560-401 Seeing/Hearing Globally Carol Ann Muller LERN 210 F 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This is a Penn Global Seminars Abroad semester long class with travel abroad after. It focuses on the interrelationship of music, arts, community-building, land, politics, and history. Places covered in coursework and travel vary by semester, and students have to apply for the class through Penn Global. The class is limited in student participation to no more than 20 students. AFRC1560401, MUSC1560401 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes)
ANTH 1610-401 Humans and the Earth System: How it Works, How We Got Here, and How to Save Our Planet Kathleen D. Morrison MCNB 150 MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM As our planet's climate changes, it is imperative to understand the basic structures of the earth system and our connections to these, past, present, and future. The goal of this course is to help students develop an integrated understanding of climate change, linking the fundamental science - from the microscopic to the global scale - to human actions and possible futures. This course brings together approaches from environmental science, social sciences, history, and policy. Beyond providing basic climate and environmental literacy, we will also explore current and projected impacts of change, including changes to human life and biodiversity as well as other physical and biological systems. The course is divided into three units: 1. Science: what are the chemical and physical drivers of our changing climate, and what are the biological, health and environmental implications so far. 2. Impacts: how human activity has affected environments and climate so far and how climate change is currently impacting society, nature, agriculture, health, cities, and the most vulnerable communities. 3. Solutions: the roles of policy, business, agriculture, planning, and personal choices. The course is open to undergraduate students of all disciplines. While the reading and weekly assignments will be specific to the module, students may define a capstone project that reflects their academic interests. ENVS1020001
ANTH 1670-001 Population and Public Health in Eastern Europe Kristen R Ghodsee PCPE 203 MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Since the collapse of communism in 1989 in Eastern Europe (and 1991 in the Soviet Union), many of the countries in the region have experienced public health crises and demographic catastrophe. Below replacement fertility rates and massive out migration have decimated the populations of these countries even as populations age and place unsustainable strains on pension systems and medical services. The demographic collapse has also been accompanied by falling male life expectancy and the rise of alcoholism, depression, domestic violence, and suicide. The economic exigencies of the transition from communism to capitalism dismantled welfare states at the exact moment when health services were most needed, leaving charities and nongovernmental organization to try to fill in the gaps. Through a combination of readings from the fields of epidemiology, demography, and medical anthropology, this course examines the public health implications of poverty and social dislocation in post-communist states. All readings and assignments are in English. REES1670401, REES6670401, SOCI2950001 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=ANTH1670001
ANTH 1803-001 Sacred Stuff: Religious Bodies, Places, and Objects Donovan O. Schaefer PSYL A30 TR 5:15 PM-6:44 PM Does religion start with what's in our heads? Or are religious commitments made, shaped and strengthened by the people, places, and things around us? This course will explore how religion happens in the material world. We'll start with classical and contemporary theories on the relationship of religion to stuff. We'll then consider examples of how religion is animated not just by texts, but through interactions with objects, spaces, bodies, monuments, color, design, architecture, and film. We'll ask how these material expressions of religion move beyond private faith and connect religion to politics and identity. RELS1800401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=ANTH1803001
ANTH 1905-401 GIS for the Digital Humanities and Social Sciences Emily L Hammer PCPE 201 TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course introduces students to theory and methodology of the geospatial humanities and social sciences, understood broadly as the application of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and spatial analysis techniques to the study of social and cultural patterns in the past and present. By engaging with spatial theory, spatial analysis case studies, and technical methodologies, students will develop an understanding of the questions driving, and tools available for, humanistic and social science research projects that explore change over space and time. We will use ESRI's ArcGIS software to visualize, analyze, and integrate historical, anthropological, and environmental data. Techniques will be introduced through the discussion of case studies and through demonstration of software skills. During supervised laboratory sessions, the various techniques and analyses covered will be applied to sample data and also to data from a region/topic chosen by the student. AAMW6460401, NELC1905401, NELC6900401
ANTH 1925-401 Who Owns the Past? Archaeology and Politics in the Middle East Emily L Hammer WILL 5 W 12:00 PM-2:59 PM This course explores the role of cultural heritage and archaeological discoveries in the politics of the Middle East from the nineteenth century to the recent aftermath of the Arab Spring. We will explore how modern Middle East populations relate to their pasts and how archaeology and cultural heritage have been employed to support particular political and social agendas, including colonialism, nationalism, imperialism, and the construction of ethnic-religious identities. Although it was first introduced to the Middle East as a colonial enterprise by European powers, archaeology became a pivotal tool for local populations of the Middle East to construct new histories and identities during the post-World War I period of intensive nation-building after the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire. To understand this process, we will first look at the nineteenth-century establishment of archaeology by institutions like the Penn Museum. Then we will move on to individual case studies in Turkey, Iraq, Egypt, Israel/Palestine, Iran, and the republics of former Soviet Transcaucasia to look at the role of archaeology and cultural heritage in the formation of these countries as modern nation-states with a shared identity among citizens. We will conclude with an examination of the recent impact of the Islamic State on material heritage in Syria and Iraq, the changing attitudes of Middle Eastern countries toward foreign museums, and the role of UNESCO in defining Middle Eastern sites of world heritage. The course will also include field trips to the Penn Museum. NELC2900401
ANTH 2024-401 Dress and Fashion in Africa Ali B. Ali-Dinar WILL 25 TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Throughout Africa, social and cultural identities of ethnicity, gender, generation, rank and status were conveyed in a range of personal ornamentation that reflects the variation of African cultures. The meaning of one particular item of clothing can transform completely when moved across time and space. As one of many forms of expressive culture, dress shape and give forms to social bodies. In the study of dress and fashion, we could note two distinct broad approaches, the historical and the anthropological. While the former focuses on fashion as a western system that shifted across time and space, and linked with capitalism and western modernity; the latter approach defines dress as an assemblage of modification the body. The Africanist proponents of this anthropological approach insisted that fashion is not a dress system specific to the west and not tied with the rise of capitalism. This course will focus on studying the history of African dress by discussing the forces that have impacted and influenced it overtime, such as socio-economic, colonialism, religion, aesthetics, politics, globalization, and popular culture. The course will also discuss the significance of the different contexts that impacted the choices of what constitute an appropriate attire for distinct situations. African dress in this context is not a fixed relic from the past, but a live cultural item that is influenced by the surrounding forces. AFRC2324401, ARTH2094401
ANTH 2070-401 Primate Behavior and Ecology Caroline E Jones MUSE 330 WF 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course explores the behavior of wild primates and the ecological models that attempt to explain the evolution of these behaviors. The evolution and taxonomy of primates will be reviewed, followed by a brief history of wild primate studies. We will then explore primate behavior through theoretical frameworks ranging from socioecological theory to sexual selection. Topics discussed include, but are not limited to, socioecology, aggression, kinship, cooperation, reproductive strategies, cognition, and conservation. Those enrolled in the graduate section (ANTH 6070) will have additional responsibilities assigned. ANTH6070401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=ANTH2070401
ANTH 2080-401 Anthropology of Futurity Adriana Petryna MUSE 328 W 1:45 PM-4:44 PM How should we think about the future amid worlds on edge? What is an inevitable versus a contingent course of events? What role do humans and non-humans, machines, animals, and plants play as agents of futurity in the context of the Anthropocene? This seminar explores these pressing questions, linking multiple sources of knowledge production—biological, medical, ecological, engineering, economic, and anthropological—with manifestations of the future. It starts with the basic premise that futures are made, molded by competing material, economic, and creative desires and possibilities, and not foreordained. Innovating futures also entails unexpected ethical and technical entanglements that current forms of knowledge cannot always anticipate. Drawing from readings in anthropology, the social studies of science and technology, Indigenous studies, as well as from engineering, AI, and scientific journals and films, we explore tensions between knowledge and uncertainty on the one hand, and ethics and innovation on the other. With these tensions in mind, we consider the myriad of agents whose role will be vital to shaping planetary futures—as well as how alternative futures, especially among communities confronting systemic inequalities and colonial and race-based injustices, are imagined and realized. From the climate crises to the ongoing pandemics, militarization, and mass migrations that have torn apart social fabrics, we will learn to become ‘technologists of the future’—that is, individuals and collectives with the tools to realize more inclusive, flourishing, and just futurities. DSGN3120401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=ANTH2080401
ANTH 2093-401 Psyche, Trauma, Culture Emily K Ng MUSE 329 T 1:45 PM-4:44 PM What shapes our psychic lives today? How are histories of pain and creative possibility transmitted, ruptured, and transformed? The language of mental health and trauma have become more present in recent years. These vocabularies have made room for conversations about forms of violence that may have been difficult to put into words before. In the United States, this includes the insidious effects of racialization, indigenous dispossession, and other forms of exclusion, extraction, and misrecognition. Yet, the rise of mental health discourses also poses new conundrums, as self-care is increasingly promoted in times of collective crisis, and trauma becomes a basis on which to seek rights, recognition, and resources. This course draws on the works of anthropologists, psychoanalysts, and decolonial thinkers to explore tensions between trauma, culture, and the psyche. We begin with common encounters that inform and disrupt our lives, examine historical and contemporary concepts of trauma, and close with questions of what lives on. ASAM2093401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=ANTH2093401
ANTH 2267-401 Living World in Archaeological Science Katherine M Moore
Chantel E. White
MUSE 190 TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM By focusing on the scientific analysis of archaeological remains, this course will explore life and death in the past. It takes place in the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and is team taught in three modules: human skeletal analysis, analysis of animal remains, and analysis of plant remains. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how organic materials provide key information about past environments, human behavior, and cultural change through discussions of topics such as health and disease, inequality, and food. ANTH5267401, CLST3303401, CLST5303401, NELC2950401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=ANTH2267401
ANTH 2329-301 Psychoanalytic and Anthropological Perspectives on Childhood Lawrence D. Blum
Alejandra Wortman
MUSE 419 T 3:30 PM-6:29 PM How do people become who they are, both similar to others and uniquely individual? How might these similarities and differences be shaped by childhood experiences in family, community, and societies around the world? How do children develop emotionally? Morally? What features of human development, expression of emotions, and relational patterns are universal for our species? What features are not universal? And what is and is not known about these questions? In this course, we will consider these and many other questions. We will read about and discuss complex and dynamic interactions between culture and individual psychology, and between nature and nurture from birth to adulthood. We will carefully examine various phases of human development as described by psychoanalysts and anthropologists. The course includes anthropologic and psychoanalytic readings and videotapes, as well as literature, fairy tales, and mythologies from cultures around the world. The instructors are both psychiatrists, one a psychoanalyst, the other a psychoanalytically sophisticated child psychiatrist. The course counts towards the Psychoanalytic Studies (PSYS) Minor.
ANTH 2515-401 Race, Rights and Rebellion Keisha-Khan Perry CANCELED This course provides an in-depth examination of theories of race and different kinds of social struggles for freedom around the globe. We will critically engage the latest scholarship from a variety of scholars and social movement actors. From anti-slavery revolts to struggles for independence to anti-apartheid movements, this course will emphasize how racialized peoples have employed notions of rights and societal resources grounded in cultural differences. Though much of the readings will highlight the experiences of African descendant peoples in Africa and its diaspora, the course will also explore the intersections of Black struggles with social movements organized by indigenous peoples in the Americas. Students will also have the unique experience of accessing readings primarily written by primarily Black scholars, some of whom have participated as key actors in the social movements they describe. Key concepts include power, resistance, subaltern, hegemony, identity politics, consciousness, and intellectual activism. The course will be organized around the following objectives: 1. To explore a range of contemporary theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches to the study of social movements; 2. To focus on the relationship between race, gender, class, culture, and politics in the African diaspora; 3. To study the historical development of organized struggles, social protests, uprisings, revolutions, insurgencies, and rebellions; 4. To examine the political agency of African descendant peoples in the global struggle for liberation and citizenship. AFRC3515401, LALS3515401, SOCI2907401
ANTH 2590-401 Nutritional Anthropology Caroline E Jones FAGN 118 MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM The course is an introduction to nutritional anthropology, an area of anthropology concerned with human nutrition and food systems in social, cultural and historical contexts. On the one hand, nutritional anthropologists study the significance of the food quest in terms of survival and health. On the other hand, they also know that people eat food for a variety of reasons that may have little, if anything, to do with nutrition, health, or survival. While the availability of food is dependent upon the physical environment, food production systems, and economic resources, food choice and the strategies human groups employ to gain access to and distribute food are deeply embedded in specific cultural patterns, social relationships, and political and economic systems. Thus, nutritional anthropology represents the interface between anthropology and the nutritional sciences, and as such, can provide powerful insights into the interactions of social and biological factors in the context of the nutritional health of individuals and populations. Because food and nutrition are quintessential biocultural issues, the course takes a biocultural approach drawing on perspectives from biological, socio-cultural and political-economic anthropology. Course content will include: a discussion of approaches to nutritional anthropology; basics of human nutrition; food systems, food behaviors and ideas; methods of dietary and nutritional assessment; and a series of case studies addressing causes and consequences to nutritional problems across the world. LALS2590401, URBS2590401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=ANTH2590401
ANTH 2730-601 Global Health: Anthropological Perspectives Michael B Joiner MUSE 328 W 5:15 PM-8:14 PM In some parts of the world spending on pharmaceuticals is astronomical. In others, people struggle for survival amid new and reemerging epidemics and have little or no access to basic or life-saving therapies. Treatments for infectious diseases that disproportionately affect the world's poor remain under-researched and global health disparities are increasing. This interdisciplinary seminar integrates perspectives from the social sciences and the biomedical sciences to explore 1) the development and global flows of medical technologies; 2) how the health of individuals and groups is affected by medical technologies, public policy, and the forces of globalization as each of these impacts local worlds. The seminar is structured to allow us to examine specific case material from around the world (Haiti, South Africa, Brazil, Russia, China, India, for example), and to address the ways in which social, political-economic, and technological factors -- which are increasingly global in nature -- influence basic biological mechanisms and disease outcomes and distribution. As we analyze each case and gain familiarity with ethnographic methods, we will ask how more effective interventions can be formulated. The course draws from historical and ethnographic accounts, medical journals, ethical analyses, and films, and familiarizes students with critical debates on globalization and with local responses to globalizing processes. HSOC2382601
ANTH 2762-401 Everyday Life in Africa Adewale Adebanwi WILL 3 TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This course will explore the different dimensions of everyday life in Africa. Everyday life has been described by Agnes Heller (1978) as “the secret yeast of history.” What constitutes this “yeast of history” in contemporary Africa? In exploring everyday life, we will examine the existing (in)capacities in the structures of state and society in Africa for human well-being in relation to the differences between political life (bios) and bare life (zoe). The course engages with the everyday life in terms of how social, economic, and political lives are constituted and the implications of this process for whether Africans live well or not, how they die, and their struggles for alternative lives. With (ethnographic) accounts and perspectives from different countries in Africa, the course focuses deeply on how to understand and explain the conditions under which everyday social needs and economic necessities are turned into political/existential struggles as well as the conditions under which political exigencies can transform into economic, social and bodily fatalities. The overarching questions that will animate this course include these: What are the prevalent conditions of everyday life in Africa? What and who determines (in)eligibility regarding the everyday tools of good life and human survival? How are these determinations related to the differential distribution of potential and/or actual injury, harm, and damage to human life and the conditions of its survival? What can ethnographic insight contribute to our understanding of everydayness in Africa? The roles of sexualities, gender, generation, humor, identities, racism, hate, memory, memorial, transactions, etc., in the construction, reconstruction, and deconstruction of daily life – and death – in the continent will be examined. Audio-visual materials will be used to analyze important themes about quotidian life in Africa. AFRC2762401, SOCI2905401
ANTH 2970-401 Nature Culture Environmentalism Nikhil Anand MUSE 328 F 10:15 AM-1:14 PM Water wars, deforestation, climate change. Amidst many uncertain crises, in this course we will explore the emergent relationship between people and the environment in different parts of the world. How do people access the resources they need to live? How, when and for whom does 'nature' come to matter? Why does it matter? And what analytical tools we might use to think, mitigate and adapt to the effects of climate change? Drawing together classical anthropological texts and some of the emergent debates in the field of climate studies and environmental justice, in this class we focus on the social-ecological processes through which different groups of humans imagine, produce and inhabit anthropogenic environments. URBS2970401 Society sector (all classes)
ANTH 3180-401 Anthropology and Praxis Paulette Nicole Branson
Gretchen E L Suess
FAGN 103 R 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This course focuses on real world community problems, engaged scholarship, and the evaluation of actively-running Penn programs intended to improve social conditions in West Philadelphia. Two trends emerge in public interest social science that students will explore through research and evaluation: 1.) mergingproblem solving with theory and analysis in the interest of change motivated bya commitment to social justice, racial harmony, equality, and human rights; and 2.) engaging in public debate on human issues to make the research results accessible to a broad audience. As part of the course, students will learn the foundations of anthropology, social theory, and evaluation as they work with qualitative and quantitative data while conducting an evaluation based on community and partner need. Students will gain direct experience conducting evaluation research as a collaborative process and have an opportunity to engage in academically-based community service with a focus on social change. ANTH6180401
ANTH 3215-401 Archaeology of Animals Katherine M Moore MUSE 190 TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This course introduces the study of animal bones from archaeological sites. Faunal analysis is an interdisciplinary science which draws methods from archaeology, biology, and paleontology. Bones, shells, and other remains yield evidence for the use of animals by humans, and evidence for the biology of animals and for past environments. The course will focus on research approaches to important transitions in human-animal relationships: the development of human hunting and fishing, animal domestication, early pastoralism, and the emergence of market economies in animal products. Class presentations will include lectures and discussion concerning research design and archaeological case material, with additional videos, slidework with field and laboratory equipment, and supervised work identifying and describing archaeological materials from the University Museum's collections. This class is taught in the Zooarchaeology Laboratory of the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials ANTH5215401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=ANTH3215401
ANTH 3442-401 Making Virtual Worlds: Space, Place, and Human Experience Jeffrey Vadala DRLB 4N30 M 12:00 PM-2:59 PM In this class, we will explore virtual worlds as they shape identities, foster social interactions, and redefine our understanding of history and human experience. This class will provide equal parts of technical skill-building in virtual reality design, and engaged discussion on readings. It considers virtual reality as a way of making media, conducting scientific experiments, and probing the limits of humanity. Over the course of the semester, discussions, activities, and workshops will help you incrementally build a small-scale virtual world/gathering/or experience as your final project, informed by insights from design anthropology, neuroscience, psychology and philosophy. Key readings of scholars like Manuel Delanda and Donna Haraway will be supplemented with immersive “field trips” to boundary-breaking 3D virtual worlds crafted by contemporary artists, historically-accurate recreations of landscapes and buildings, as well as virtual worlds built by scientists to better understand the ways that brains work and bodies can be healed. At the end of the course, you will emerge with a technical skill set as well as a critical anthropological perspective on virtualized worlds. You will be able to: Integrate anthropological approaches to visual ethnography and participatory design Understand the core principles and techniques of virtual reality landscape design and development Employ industry-standard software tools to create virtual worlds, Analyze virtual reality landscapes, informed by anthropological perspectives on social interaction, identity construction, and community formation. Apply virtual reality landscape design techniques to a real-world project, employing ethnographic methods to understand user experiences, cultural contexts, and social dynamics. This course requires a basic understanding of 3D modeling software. If you have completed at least one course in computer graphics or possess equivalent experience, you possess the foundation to delve into the realm of Making Virtual Worlds. ANTH6442401, FNAR3442401, FNAR6442401
ANTH 3443-401 Creative Studio for Ethnographers Alissa M. Jordan MEYH B2 W 12:00 PM-2:59 PM This intensive practice-based workshop is a semester-long creative studio for students seeking to bring an existing experimental ethnography project to fruition, both in terms of production quality and theoretical engagement. Here, “experimental” implies an engagement with a creative process whose outcomes are unknown and unpredictable, while “ethnography” suggests a project that engages a shared social world or community. Rather than limit ourselves to one creative medium or theory base, this class will be shaped in conversation with students' specific interests, and is open to those exploring a variety of media forms. Students are expected to enter the class with a rough draft of an experimental ethnographic project (a collection of photographs, illustrations, video clips, a sound piece, a creative story, a short film, etc…). Over the course of the semester, this draft will be continuously honed and re-iterated through community conversation. In the introductory portion of the course, we will draw on pedagogical methods developed in art studio settings as we learn about one another’s projects, build a shared language for understanding and responding to each other's work. The second phase and bulk of the course will involve a rotating schedule of presentations and response sessions, when students will present a new iteration of their in-process work and the class will respond substantively, rigorously, and thoroughly using the shared language developed at the beginning of the course. Instructors will prepare weekly class ethnographic readings/screenings that draw from the presenting students theoretical/methodological engagements, and provoke stimulating discussion. Over the course of the semester, students will present four increasingly-honed iterations of their project, culminating in a showcase/exhibit at the end of the course (which may be private or public, depending on students aims). For their final assignment, students will submit their project to the journal/platform/exhibit they selected at the beginning of the course and/or outline a course of action for doing so. ANTH6443401, FNAR3443401, FNAR6443401
ANTH 3520-401 Music, Religion, Ritual in South and Southeast Asia. James Sykes LERN 102 TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM What role does music play in articulating religious identities and spaces? What is the importance of ritual musics as they persist and change in the modern world? How does music reflect and articulate religious ways of thinking and acting? In this course, we explore these and other questions about the interrelations between music, religion, and ritual in South and Southeast Asia. Focusing on India, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, and Indonesia, the course emphasizes musics from Hindu, Buddhist, Muslim and Christian traditions; nevertheless, it draws widely to touch upon sacred musics in Pakistan, Nepal, Burma, Thailand, Vietnam, and among some indigenous peoples in the region. Throughout, we explore ontologies of sound; sonic occurrences in religious structures, public processions, and pilgrimage sites; the construction of religion and ritual as ideas forged through colonial encounter and modern scholarship on religion; the politics of sacred sounds in today's public spaces and contemporary media, such as television and online; and the surprising fluidity between popular and sacred musical genres. MUSC3520401
ANTH 3521-001 Health, Gender, and Sexuality Joshua B Franklin MUSE 330 MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course will explore gender and sexuality as areas of medical care and intervention. We will examine the complex relationships between health, gender, and sexuality, including the ways that gender and sexual identity affect health as well as how medicine shapes and defines gender and sexuality, historically and in the present. We will discuss topics including reproductive health and technology, gender and mental health, and gender-affirming medical care. Across these different areas, we will ask: how do gender and sexuality affect how health is experienced and healthcare is accessed? What forms of gender and sexual identity are embraced and fostered by medical practices? How should we understand the medical interest in gender and sexuality, and how do practices of health contribute to the continual redefinition of gender and sexuality? How do the intersections of gender and sexuality with other axes of social identity affect how medical care is experienced? Can anthropological ideas about gender and sexuality inform efforts in public health and clinical medicine to redress gender- and sexuality-based harms? Course readings will include work in medical anthropology as well as queer and trans theory and feminist psychoanalysis. Students will complete an independent project focused on a topic related to gender, sexuality, and health of their choosing. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=ANTH3521001
ANTH 3620-401 Agroecology: Farming & the Planet Kathleen D. Morrison CHEM 514 T 10:15 AM-1:14 PM Food production, essential to life, is also today a major contributor to climate change. In this course, we examine farming and food through the rubric of agroecology, an approach that integrates biological, cultural, and historical factors to develop understandings of farming and food history as well as agriculture's multiple contemporary forms, industrial and non-industrial. We will cover basic aspects of crop evolution and growth, soil, water, and nutrients, with a special focus on the historical global diversity of farming systems, especially in terms of potential alternatives to industrial agriculture. This review forms the foundation for a broader consideration of the impacts of food systems on the planet, and ways to address challenges of climate change, food security, and food sovereignty. ANTH5620401
ANTH 3666-401 Crafting an Ethnography of Vulnerability (SNF Paideia Course) Ernesto Pujol DRLB 3C4 W 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Crafting an Ethnography of Vulnerability What if we could practice a radical ethnography of vulnerability because we believe that truly democratized, ethical engagement requires the unconditional vulnerability of the ethnographer: the relinquishing of all academic, professional, and project power bullying through a humble transparency and personal permeability that immediately triggers trust by de-enshrining the intellectual, by bravely including the emotional and spiritual life of the empathic ethnographer. Most of reality is invisible; the deeper communal paths are psychic. I am a veteran, multi-disciplinary social choreographer who has intuitively employed ethnographic tools and strategies for the past 30 years, collectively producing transformative performative portraits of threatened communities. For this graduate and undergraduate seniors workshop, I wish to invite students into my field process, in terms of my readings and roamings through the world. The workshop experience will culminate in a field trip to San Juan under the auspices of the Conservation Trust of Puerto Rico, to visit historic colonial sites and contemporary model projects such as El Departamento de la Comida, a queer farming collective. Travel over the week of spring break is required for our course, with airfare, in-country travel, room and board covered completely for all students (thanks to generous support from the Padeia program). ANTH6666401, FNAR3666401, FNAR6666401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=ANTH3666401
ANTH 3667-401 Advanced Documentary Storytelling Ra'Anan Alexandrowicz PSYL B50 R 1:45 PM-4:44 PM The course is intended for students who have already taken an earlier documentary course and have an interest in film work or research in the nonfiction realm. The course will isolate, highlight, and explore the aspect of narration (storytelling) in documentary cinema. The objective is to enhance students’ understanding of the relation between content and form in documentary films; provide them with critical and aesthetic tools to think about nonfiction cinema and inspire them to find original and expressive ways to deliver their own non-fiction material to audiences. The very definition of a film as “nonfiction” implies (perhaps wrongly) that it is not written and directed in the way that a fiction film is. We must ask ourselves, then, where in craft of nonfiction filmmaking lies the storytelling? Over the trajectory of the course, we will be analyzing the narrative system of several documentary films. We will learn how story-telling tools are employed in nonfiction cinema and examine the aesthetical and ethical dilemmas unique to nonfiction storytelling. Rather than classifying films by their themes such as “war”, “family” or “race relations” - or categorizing them by accepted taxonomies in documentary theory (“observational”, “classical” or “performative”) - our method we will suggest that an effective way to study a documentary film is to start by identifying its primary documentary material, and to observe how the tools of cinema (diegetic and non-diegetic elements) are applied to this material - creating the storytelling system of the film. The primary material, the element that instigates the making of a documentary, is often a character, a strong human story or an event, but it may also be something much more abstract: An experience, a memory; a place; a painting; an essay or theory, or many other possibilities. The course will begin with the exploration of texts on narrative and documentary theory which will help us define both nonfiction and narration - concepts that will be at the foundation of our discourse moving forward. Once the foundations for exploring narration in the context of nonfiction will have been laid, we will move into to the second and third parts of the course, in which the class will study masterful documentaries, and explore the way their narration systems work, identifying elements that emerge as common narrating “tools”. Then, we will reverse our approach. In the last unit of the course, we will “zoom in” on the specific story-telling elements we identified in our exploration and see how they are used by different filmmakers to achieve different objectives. By the end of the course students should have a grasp of the way characters and events are constructed in documentaries, as well as how filmmakers create storytelling systems and find narrative solutions for challenging and original nonfiction stories. ANTH6667401, CIMS3667401
ANTH 3745-401 Rights of/for Nature: Critical Engagements from Latin America Carolina Angel Botero EDUC 202 TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course delves into various approximations of the Rights of Nature movement. It specifically examines a range of legal actions that have arisen to safeguard life and emphasize human relationships with non-human entities. The course is particularly dedicated to dissecting a range of legal strategies that have come into existence to ensure the preservation of life forms beyond just humans, forging a profound connection between humanity and the diverse entities that constitute the natural world. The course will concentrate on Latin American cases as a burgeoning global movement, although the philosophical and theoretical exploration extends far beyond this region. Some topics we will discuss in class are: Earth Law and the Rights of Nature; Bringing Nature to Court and the Law; and Animal Rights. For instance, are animals part of the Rights of Nature movement?  By analyzing these legal actions, students will understand how legal systems can be leveraged as powerful environmental conservation and advocacy tools. Students will also learn the importance of bridging the legal practice with how the social sciences approach these questions.  ANTH5745401, LALS3745401, LALS5745401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=ANTH3745401
ANTH 5211-401 Petrography of Cultural Materials Marie-Claude Boileau Introduction to thin-section petrography of stone and ceramic archaeological materials. Using polarized light microscopy, the first half of this course will cover the basics of mineralogy and the petrography of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. The second half will focus on the petrographic description of ceramic materials, mainly pottery, with emphasis on the interpretation of provenance and technology. As part of this course, students will characterize and analyze archaeological samples from various collections. Prior knowledge of geology is not required. AAMW5120401, CLST7311401
ANTH 5215-401 Archaeology of Animals Katherine M Moore MUSE 190 TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM This course introduces the study of animal bones from archaeological sites. Faunal analysis is an interdisciplinary science which draws methods from archaeology, biology, and paleontology. Bones, shells, and other remains yield evidence for the use of animals by humans, and evidence for the biology of animals and for past environments. The course will focus on research approaches to important transitions in human-animal relationships: the development of human hunting and fishing, animal domestication, early pastoralism, and the emergence of market economies in animal products. Class presentations will include lectures and discussion concerning research design and archaeological case material, with additional videos, slidework with field and laboratory equipment, and supervised work identifying and describing archaeological materials from the University Museum's collections. This class is taught in the Zooarchaeology Laboratory of the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials ANTH3215401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=ANTH5215401
ANTH 5252-401 Archaeometallurgy Seminar Vanessa Workman MUSE 190 F 8:30 AM-11:29 AM This course is designed to provide an in-depth analysis of archaeological metals. Topics to be discussed include: exploitation of ore and its transformation to metal in ancient times, distribution of metal as a raw materials, provenance studies, development and organization of early metallurgy, and interdisciplinary investigations of metals and related artifacts like slag and crucibles. Students will become familiar with the full spectrum of analytical procedures, ranging from microscopy for materials characterization to mass spectrometry for geochemical fingerprinting, and will work on individual research projects analyzing archaeological objects following the analytical methodology of archaeometallurgy. AAMW5520401, CLST7314401, NELC6950401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=ANTH5252401
ANTH 5267-401 Living World in Archaeological Science Katherine M Moore
Chantel E. White
MUSE 190 TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM By focusing on the scientific analysis of archaeological remains, this course will explore life and death in the past. It takes place in the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and is team taught in three modules: human skeletal analysis, analysis of animal remains, and analysis of plant remains. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how organic materials provide key information about past environments, human behavior, and cultural change through discussions of topics such as health and disease, inequality, and food. ANTH2267401, CLST3303401, CLST5303401, NELC2950401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=ANTH5267401
ANTH 5318-301 Politics of Psychic Life Emily K Ng MUSE 330 W 3:30 PM-6:29 PM The psyche has long been a site of translation, contention, and imagination. From colonial discourses on the mentality of others to political philosophies of reason and autonomy, mental life has been a central figure in claims to modernity. Meanwhile, problems of psychic subjugation and liberation have been crucial to anti-imperialist and anti-psychiatric movements, including spiritual traditions that do not take the problem to be a secular one. Since COVID-19, forms of psychic suffering old and new have intensified across experiences of collective isolation, racialized violence, and extraction and surveillance (digital and otherwise), accompanied by calls to decolonize mental health. This seminar engages with classic and contemporary texts from anthropology and beyond to rethink the politics of psychic life today. How might attention to psychic life, broadly conceived, make way for new forms of critical and transformative inquiry?
ANTH 5320-301 Medical Anthropology in the Anthropocene Adriana Petryna MUSE 328 M 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Ongoing climate crises, militarization, racial injustice, and mass migration have torn apart social fabrics and have further exposed the unequal structures of power that have defined health, how it is realized, and for whom. The massive human toll of COVID-19 and demands for reparations from communities around the world confront health institutions and expose their colonial, scientific, and epistemic underpinnings. From colonial histories of medicine to movements to decolonize global and planetary health, this seminar charts how anthropological and trans-disciplinary forms of research can help shift knowledge claims about injury and vulnerability away from hegemonic centers to frontline communities. This shift implies tracking the lived aspects of health both in and beyond clinical spaces and into multiple environments (from low-wage work to toxic exposures and militarized zones) that perpetuate human/nonhuman vulnerabilities and unequal exposures to disease. As we consider multi-faceted efforts (including traditions of mutual aid and care, de-occupation and, more recently, abolition medicine) to reverse such trends, we probe innovations, forms of resistance, and ethical and political potentials unleashed by diverse justice struggles, and through which diverse planetary futures are imagined and realized.
ANTH 5440-401 Public Environmental Humanities Bethany Wiggin HAYD 358 W 3:30 PM-6:29 PM By necessity, work in environmental humanities spans academic disciplines. By design, it can also address and engage publics beyond traditional academic settings. This seminar explores best practices in public environmental humanities. Students receive close mentoring and build collaborative community to develop and execute cross-disciplinary, public engagement projects on the environment. This spring, this broadly interdisciplinary course is designed in conjunction with the ongoing environmental humanities project, An Ecotopian Toolkit for the Anthropocene. In the framework of our seminar, students will have opportunities to work with tne project’s curators and educators as well as Toolmakers on project-based assignments that also engage wider publics around issues of climate and environmental justice. This lab-style seminar is suitable for advanced undergraduates (with permission) and fulfills the “Capstone” requirement for the Minor in Environmental Humanities. It is also open to graduate students in departments across Arts and Sciences as well as other schools at the university. COML5440401, ENVS5440401, GRMN5440401, URBS5440401
ANTH 5460-401 Global Citizenship Kathleen D. Hall STIT 357 T 11:45 AM-1:44 PM This course examines the possibilities and limitations of conceiving of and realizing citizenship on a global scale. Readings, guest lecturers, and discussions will focus on dilemmas associated with addressing issues that transcend national boundaries. In particular, the course compares global/local dynamics that emerge across different types of improvement efforts focusing on distinctive institutions and social domains, including: educational development; human rights; humanitarian aid; free trade; micro-finance initiatives; and the global environmental movement. The course has two objectives: to explore research and theoretical work related to global citizenship, social engagement, and international development; and to discuss ethical and practical issues that emerge in the local contexts where development initiatives are implemented. EDUC5431401, URBS5460401
ANTH 5467-401 Community Youth Filmmaking Amitanshu Das PSYL B35 R 1:45 PM-4:14 PM This course focuses on how the filmmaking medium and process can provide a means for engaging youth in ethnographically grounded civic action projects where they learn about, reflect on, and communicate to others about their issues in their schools and communities. Students receive advanced training in film and video for social change. A project-based service-learning course, students collaborate with Philadelphia high school students and community groups to make films and videos that encourage creative self-expression and represent issues important to youth, schools, and local communities. Stories and themes on emotional well-being, safety, health, environmental issues, racism and social justice are particularly encouraged. A central thread throughout is to assess and reflect upon the strengths (and weaknesses) of contemporary film (digital, online) in fostering debate, discussion and catalyzing community action and social change. The filmmaking medium and process itself is explored as a means to engage and interact with communities. This course provides a grounding in theories, concepts, methods and practices of community engagement derived from Community Participatory Video, Youth Participatory Action Research (YPAR) and Ethnographic methods. For the very first time, Penn students will be trained to operate a state-of-the-art TV studio at PSTV (Philadelphia Schools TV). At the end of the semester approved films will be screened with an accompanying panel discussion at an event at the School District of Philadelphia (SDP). These films will also be broadcast on Comcast Philadelphia's PSTV Channel 52 and webcast via the district's website and YouTube channel. This is an ABCS course, and students will produce short ethnographic films with students in Philadelphia high schools as part of a partnership project with the School District of Philadelphia. EDUC 5466 Ethnographic Filmmaking (or equivalent) is a pre-requisite or permission of instructor. EDUC5467401
ANTH 5470-401 Anthropology and Education Leigh Llewellyn Graham EDUC 121 M 11:45 AM-1:44 PM An introduction to the intent, approach, and contribution of anthropology to the study of socialization and schooling in cross-cultural perspective. Education is examined in traditional, colonial, and complex industrial societies. EDUC5495401, URBS5470401
ANTH 5570-401 Archaeology of Landscapes Mark T Lycett MUSE 419 R 10:15 AM-1:14 PM Traditionally, archaeological research has focused on the "site" or "sites." Regional investigation tends to stress settlement pattern and settlement system determined through archaeological site survey. This seminar will stress the space between the sites or "points" on the landscape. Most previous attempts at "landscape archaeology" tended to focus on the relationship of sites and the natural environment. This course will highlight the cultural, "anthropogenic," or "built environment"--in this case human modification and transformation of the natural landscape in the form of pathways, roads, causeways, monuments, walls, agricultural fields and their boundaries, gardens, astronomical and calendrical alignments, and water distribution networks. Features will be examined in terms of the "social logic" or formal patterning of cultural space. These can provide insights into indigenous structures such as measurement systems, land tenure, social organization, engineering, cosmology, calendars, astronomy, cognition, and ritual practices. Landscapes are also the medium for understanding everyday life, experience, movement, memory, identity, time, and historical ecology. Ethnographic, ethnohistorical, and archaeological case studies will be investigated from both the Old and New Worlds. AAMW5570401, LALS5570401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=ANTH5570401
ANTH 5620-401 Agroecology: Farming & the Planet Kathleen D. Morrison CHEM 514 T 10:15 AM-1:14 PM Food production, essential to life, is also today a major contributor to climate change. In this course, we examine farming and food through the rubric of agroecology, an approach that integrates biological, cultural, and historical factors to develop understandings of farming and food history as well as agriculture's multiple contemporary forms, industrial and non-industrial. We will cover basic aspects of crop evolution and growth, soil, water, and nutrients, with a special focus on the historical global diversity of farming systems, especially in terms of potential alternatives to industrial agriculture. This review forms the foundation for a broader consideration of the impacts of food systems on the planet, and ways to address challenges of climate change, food security, and food sovereignty. Graduate students will prepare a research paper. ANTH3620401
ANTH 5720-401 Geophysical Prospection for Archaeology Jason Herrmann MUSE 190 M 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Near-surface geophysical prospection methods are now widely used in archaeology as they allow archaeologists to rapidly map broad areas, minimize or avoid destructive excavation, and perceive physical dimensions of archaeological features that are outside of the range of human perception. This course will cover the theory of geophysical sensors commonly used in archaeological investigations and the methods for collecting, processing, and interpreting geophysical data from archaeological contexts. We will review the physical properties of common archaeological and paleoenvironmental targets, the processes that led to their deposition and formation, and how human activity is reflected in anomalies recorded through geophysical survey through lectures, readings, and discussion. Students will gain experience collecting data in the field with various sensors at archaeological sites in the region. A large proportion of the course will be computer-based as students work with data from geophysical sensors, focusing on the fundamentals of data processing, data fusion, and interpretation. Some familiarity with GIS is recommended. AAMW5720401, CLST7315401, NELC5925401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=ANTH5720401
ANTH 5745-401 Rights of/for Nature: Critical Engagements from Latin America Carolina Angel Botero EDUC 202 TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course delves into various approximations of the Rights of Nature movement. It specifically examines a range of legal actions that have arisen to safeguard life and emphasize human relationships with non-human entities. The course is particularly dedicated to dissecting a range of legal strategies that have come into existence to ensure the preservation of life forms beyond just humans, forging a profound connection between humanity and the diverse entities that constitute the natural world. The course will concentrate on Latin American cases as a burgeoning global movement, although the philosophical and theoretical exploration extends far beyond this region. Some topics we will discuss in class are: Earth Law and the Rights of Nature; Bringing Nature to Court and the Law; and Animal Rights. For instance, are animals part of the Rights of Nature movement? By analyzing these legal actions, students will understand how legal systems can be leveraged as powerful environmental conservation and advocacy tools. Students will also learn the importance of bridging the legal practice with how the social sciences approach these questions. ANTH3745401, LALS3745401, LALS5745401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=ANTH5745401
ANTH 5857-640 Cultural Heritage and Conflict Brian I Daniels DRLB 3C8 R 5:15 PM-8:14 PM Intentional destruction of cultural heritage is designed to erase the presence of a people in history and has become an all too familiar feature of the devastation wrought by contemporary violence and "ethnic cleansing." Recent cases appear frequently in news headlines and include such well-known examples as the 2001 demolition of the Bamiyan Buddhas in Afghanistan, the 2012 destruction of Sufi shrines in Timbuktu, Mali, and the recent obliteration of historic sites across Syria and Iraq. This course explores this phenomenon by examining such questions as: Why is cultural heritage targeted in conflict? Under what circumstances? By whom? In so doing, we will engage with readings that discuss the historical development of the international laws and norms that aim to protect cultural heritage during conflict and examples successful and unsuccessful humanitarian interventions.
ANTH 5955-301 Evaluative Practices and the Problem of "Value" Andrew M. Carruthers MUSE 330 M 1:45 PM-4:44 PM The problem of “value” has long beguiled and bedeviled scholars across the humanities and social sciences. In this seminar, we unravel this problematic by exploring the way “value” has been variably characterized as both that which agents strive for and that which signs stand for. Ultimately, our focus will not be on “value” per se, but on “evaluation” as a discursive and semiotic process that reflects and shapes the ways we humans navigate and negotiate our worlds. Drawing from wide-ranging ethnographic examples, and informed by classical and contemporary theoretical issues in the humanities and social sciences, we will re-evaluate value as a matter of anthropological concern.
ANTH 6010-301 Contemporary Approaches to the Study of Culture and Society Kristina M Lyons MUSE 419 W 9:00 AM-11:59 AM A critical examination of recent history and theory in cultural and social anthropology. Topics include structural-functionalism; symbolic anthropology; post-modern theory. Emphasis is on major schools and trends in America, Britain, and France.
ANTH 6015-301 Queer Anthropology Sa'Ed Atshan CANCELED This graduate seminar offers a chronological exploration of queer anthropology. We trace the trajectory of this subfield: how has research on non-normative forms of gender and sexuality enriched the discipline of anthropology? And how have anthropological theory and methods contributed to lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgender/queer/intersex (LGBTQI) studies? Our seminar examines feminist and queer ethnography as genres of writing and as modalities of praxis. We traverse a wide geographic scope in our readings, including North America, Latin America, the Caribbean, Sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, East Asia, South Asia, and Southeast Asia. This cross-cultural lens elucidates how queer epistemologies, ontologies, and subjectivities intersect with legacies of colonialism, imperialism, indigeneity, nationalism, transnationalism, race, religion, class, disability, medicine, technology, social movements, activism, family, and affect (including pleasure and joy). Students will gain a deep understanding of anthropological concepts—and their convergences with queer theory—including notions of sexuality, gender, embodiment, agency, performativity, identity, physical and structural violence, narrative, representation, and social change. As we consider the past, present, and future of queer anthropology we will also discern a foundational question of what constitutes queer ethnography.
ANTH 6020-301 Evolutionary Anthropology Theodore G Schurr MUSE 330 T 10:15 AM-1:14 PM This course will explore various subfields of biological anthropology to better understand what it means to be human. Special attention will be paid to current issues and problems in these subfields, and the different ways in which researchers are attempting to understand and uncover the details of human evolution. Among the areas that are explored in this course are paleoanthropology, primatology, human biology, molecular anthropology, evolutionary medicine, epigenetics, and human life history. Specific issues to be explored include the primate roots of human behavior, brain and language evolution, new fossil hominins, the origins of anatomically modern humans, and modern human migration history.
ANTH 6070-401 Primate Behavior and Ecology Caroline E Jones MUSE 330 WF 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course explores the behavior of wild primates and the ecological models that attempt to explain the evolution of these behaviors. The evolution and taxonomy of primates will be reviewed, followed by a brief history of wild primate studies. We will then explore primate behavior through theoretical frameworks ranging from socioecological theory to sexual selection. Topics discussed include, but are not limited to, socioecology, aggression, kinship, cooperation, reproductive strategies, cognition, and conservation. Those enrolled in the graduate section (ANTH 6070) will have additional responsibilities assigned. ANTH2070401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=ANTH6070401
ANTH 6180-401 Anthropology and Praxis Paulette Nicole Branson
Gretchen E L Suess
FAGN 103 R 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This course focuses on real world community problems, engaged scholarship, and the evaluation of actively-running Penn programs intended to improve social conditions in West Philadelphia. Two trends emerge in public interest social science that students will explore through research and evaluation: 1.) mergingproblem solving with theory and analysis in the interest of change motivated bya commitment to social justice, racial harmony, equality, and human rights; and 2.) engaging in public debate on human issues to make the research results accessible to a broad audience. As part of the course, students will learn the foundations of anthropology, social theory, and evaluation as they work with qualitative and quantitative data while conducting an evaluation based on community and partner need. Students will gain direct experience conducting evaluation research as a collaborative process and have an opportunity to engage in academically-based community service with a focus on social change. ANTH3180401
ANTH 6442-401 Making Virtual Worlds: Space, Place, and Human Experience Jeffrey Vadala DRLB 4N30 M 12:00 PM-2:59 PM In this class, we will explore virtual worlds as they shape identities, foster social interactions, and redefine our understanding of history and human experience. This class will provide equal parts of technical skill-building in virtual reality design, and engaged discussion on readings. It considers virtual reality as a way of making media, conducting scientific experiments, and probing the limits of humanity. Over the course of the semester, discussions, activities, and workshops will help you incrementally build a small-scale virtual world/gathering/or experience as your final project, informed by insights from design anthropology, neuroscience, psychology and philosophy. Key readings of scholars like Manuel Delanda and Donna Haraway will be supplemented with immersive “field trips” to boundary-breaking 3D virtual worlds crafted by contemporary artists, historically-accurate recreations of landscapes and buildings, as well as virtual worlds built by scientists to better understand the ways that brains work and bodies can be healed. At the end of the course, you will emerge with a technical skill set as well as a critical anthropological perspective on virtualized worlds. You will be able to: Integrate anthropological approaches to visual ethnography and participatory design Understand the core principles and techniques of virtual reality landscape design and development Employ industry-standard software tools to create virtual worlds, Analyze virtual reality landscapes, informed by anthropological perspectives on social interaction, identity construction, and community formation. Apply virtual reality landscape design techniques to a real-world project, employing ethnographic methods to understand user experiences, cultural contexts, and social dynamics. This course requires a basic understanding of 3D modeling software. If you have completed at least one course in computer graphics or possess equivalent experience, you possess the foundation to delve into the realm of Making Virtual Worlds. ANTH3442401, FNAR3442401, FNAR6442401
ANTH 6443-401 Creative Studio for Ethnographers Alissa M. Jordan MEYH B2 W 12:00 PM-2:59 PM This intensive practice-based workshop is a semester-long creative studio for students seeking to bring an existing experimental ethnography project to fruition, both in terms of production quality and theoretical engagement. Here, “experimental” implies an engagement with a creative process whose outcomes are unknown and unpredictable, while “ethnography” suggests a project that engages a shared social world or community. Rather than limit ourselves to one creative medium or theory base, this class will be shaped in conversation with students' specific interests, and is open to those exploring a variety of media forms. Students are expected to enter the class with a rough draft of an experimental ethnographic project (a collection of photographs, illustrations, video clips, a sound piece, a creative story, a short film, etc…). Over the course of the semester, this draft will be continuously honed and re-iterated through community conversation. In the introductory portion of the course, we will draw on pedagogical methods developed in art studio settings as we learn about one another’s projects, build a shared language for understanding and responding to each other's work. The second phase and bulk of the course will involve a rotating schedule of presentations and response sessions, when students will present a new iteration of their in-process work and the class will respond substantively, rigorously, and thoroughly using the shared language developed at the beginning of the course. Instructors will prepare weekly class ethnographic readings/screenings that draw from the presenting students theoretical/methodological engagements, and provoke stimulating discussion. Over the course of the semester, students will present four increasingly-honed iterations of their project, culminating in a showcase/exhibit at the end of the course (which may be private or public, depending on students aims). For their final assignment, students will submit their project to the journal/platform/exhibit they selected at the beginning of the course and/or outline a course of action for doing so. ANTH3443401, FNAR3443401, FNAR6443401
ANTH 6550-301 Methods and Grantwriting for Anthropological Research Kristina M Lyons
Lauren M Ristvet
MUSE 345 T 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This course is designed for third- and fourth-year graduate students in anthropology who are working on their dissertation research proposals and submitting grants. Graduate students from other departments who will be submitting grant proposals that include an ethnographic component are also welcome. Students will develop their proposals throughout the course of the semester, and will meet important fall submission deadlines. They will begin by working with various databases to search funding sources relevant to the research they plan to conduct. In class sessions, they will also work with the professor and their peers to refine their research questions, their methods, the relationship of any previous research to their dissertation fieldwork, and the broader theoretical and "real-world" significance of their proposed projects. Finally, students will also have the opportunity to have live "chats" with representatives from funding agencies, thereby gaining a better sense of what particular foundations are looking for in a proposal.
ANTH 6666-401 Crafting an Ethnography of Vulnerability Ernesto Pujol DRLB 3C4 W 1:45 PM-4:44 PM What if we could practice a radical ethnography of vulnerability because we believe that truly democratized, ethical engagement requires the unconditional vulnerability of the ethnographer: the relinquishing of all academic, professional, and project power bullying through a humble transparency and personal permeability that immediately triggers trust by de-enshrining the intellectual, by bravely including the emotional and spiritual life of the empathic ethnographer. Most of reality is invisible; the deeper communal paths are psychic. I am a veteran, multi-disciplinary social choreographer who has intuitively employed ethnographic tools and strategies for the past 30 years, collectively producing transformative performative portraits of threatened communities. For this graduate and undergraduate seniors workshop, I wish to invite students into my field process, in terms of my readings and roamings through the world. The workshop experience will culminate in a field trip to San Juan, under the auspices of the Conservation Trust of Puerto Rico, to visit historic colonial sites and contemporary model projects such as El Departamento de la Comida, a queer farming collective. ANTH3666401, FNAR3666401, FNAR6666401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=ANTH6666401
ANTH 6667-401 Advanced Documentary Storytelling Ra'Anan Alexandrowicz PSYL B50 R 1:45 PM-4:44 PM The course is intended for students who have already taken an earlier documentary course and have an interest in film work or research in the nonfiction realm. The course will isolate, highlight, and explore the aspect of narration (storytelling) in documentary cinema. The objective is to enhance students’ understanding of the relation between content and form in documentary films; provide them with critical and aesthetic tools to think about nonfiction cinema and inspire them to find original and expressive ways to deliver their own non-fiction material to audiences. The very definition of a film as “nonfiction” implies (perhaps wrongly) that it is not written and directed in the way that a fiction film is. We must ask ourselves, then, where in craft of nonfiction filmmaking lies the storytelling? Over the trajectory of the course, we will be analyzing the narrative system of several documentary films. We will learn how story-telling tools are employed in nonfiction cinema and examine the aesthetical and ethical dilemmas unique to nonfiction storytelling. Rather than classifying films by their themes such as “war”, “family” or “race relations” - or categorizing them by accepted taxonomies in documentary theory (“observational”, “classical” or “performative”) - our method we will suggest that an effective way to study a documentary film is to start by identifying its primary documentary material, and to observe how the tools of cinema (diegetic and non-diegetic elements) are applied to this material - creating the storytelling system of the film. The primary material, the element that instigates the making of a documentary, is often a character, a strong human story or an event, but it may also be something much more abstract: An experience, a memory; a place; a painting; an essay or theory, or many other possibilities. The course will begin with the exploration of texts on narrative and documentary theory which will help us define both nonfiction and narration - concepts that will be at the foundation of our discourse moving forward. Once the foundations for exploring narration in the context of nonfiction will have been laid, we will move into to the second and third parts of the course, in which the class will study masterful documentaries, and explore the way their narration systems work, identifying elements that emerge as common narrating “tools”. Then, we will reverse our approach. In the last unit of the course, we will “zoom in” on the specific story-telling elements we identified in our exploration and see how they are used by different filmmakers to achieve different objectives. By the end of the course students should have a grasp of the way characters and events are constructed in documentaries, as well as how filmmakers create storytelling systems and find narrative solutions for challenging and original nonfiction stories. ANTH3667401, CIMS3667401
ANTH 6859-640 Cultural Diversity and Global Connections Kathleen D. Hall MEYH B7 T 5:15 PM-8:14 PM This course considers the intensification of global connections and what anthropologist Anna Tsing has referred to as the "zones of awkward engagement" that emerge within the contemporary global capitalist order. Social problems, such as environmental change, the welfare of refugees, human rights abuses, or poverty in the Global South, have increasingly come to be seen as global issues best solved through multinational or international cooperation. Efforts to address these problems bring together diverse stakeholders, international experts, policy makers, politicians, civil servants, activists, international and local volunteers as well as local people, each interpreting "the problem" from different cultural perspectives and possessing varying degrees of power to affect change. Ethnographic analysis is particularly well suited to examining the diverse and conflicting social interactions, misunderstandings and multiple perspectives, cultural politics and power dynamics that arise locally within these zones of awkward engagement and that ultimately shape the outcomes of social change efforts. The course will emphasize the close and critical reading of ethnographic accounts of a range of social improvement efforts --environmentalist, human rights, refugee relief, and fair trade economic efforts-- across different regions of the world to gain a better understanding of how cultural diversity and power relations shape social interaction within these globalizes zones of awkward engagement. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the nature and practice of ethnographic research and of the challenges faced in engaging globally.