Courses for Spring 2022

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
ANTH 002-601 Introduction To Cultural Anthropology Kristina Solvej Nielsen M 05:15 PM-08:15 PM Anthropology as a field is the study of human beings - past, present, and future. It asks questions about what it means to be human, and whether there are universal aspects to human existence. What do we share and how do we differ? What is "natural" and what is "cultural"? What is the relationship between the past and the present? This course is designed to investigate the ways anthropology, as a discipline, emerged in conjunction with European (and later, American) imperialism, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, and the will to know and categorize difference across the world. We will probe the relationships between anthropology and modern race-making by investigating how anthropologists have studied key institutions and systems that structure human life: family and kinship, inequality and hierarchy, race and ethnicity, ritual and symbolic systems, gender and sexuality, reciprocity and exchange, and globalization and social change. The course fundamentally probes how the material and ideological constellations of any given moment shape the questions we ask and the knowledge we produce about human existence. Society sector (all classes) https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ANTH002601
ANTH 003-601 Introduction To Human Evolution Deborah I Olszewski TR 05:15 PM-06:45 PM How did humans evolve? When did humans start to walk on two legs? How are humans related to non-human primates? This course focuses on the scientific study of human evolution describing the emergence, development, and diversification of our species, Homo sapiens. First we cover the fundamental principles of evolutionary theory and some of the basics of genetics and heredity as they relate to human morphological, physiological, and genetic variation. We then examine what studies of nonhuman primates (monkeys and apes) can reveal about our own evolutionary past, reviewing the behavioral and ecological diversity seen among living primates. We conclude the course examining the "hard" evidence of human evolution - the fossil and material culture record of human history from our earliest primate ancestors to the emergence of modern Homo sapiens. You will also have the opportunity, during recitations, to conduct hands-on exercises collecting and analyzing behavioral, morphological, and genetic data on both humans and nonhuman primates and working with the Department of Anthropology's extensive collection of fossil casts. Living World Sector (all classes) Objects-Based Learning Course https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ANTH003601
ANTH 004-001 The Modern World and Its Cultural Background Gregory P Urban MW 10:15 AM-11:15 AM An introduction to the diversity of cultures in the world. This course is divided into two parts. The first briefly examines different models of understanding human diversity: ethnicities, religions, languages, political forms, economic structures, cultures, and "civilizations". Students will learn to think about the world as an interconnected whole, and know the significance of culture on a global scale. The second part is an introduction to area studies, in which we undertake a survey of the different regions of the world. We conduct the survey paying attention to the different aspects of human diversities, which we examine in the first part of this course. Students will acquire a greater appreciation and understanding of cultural differences in the more comprehensive social context. Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) Humanities & Social Science Sector
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
ANTH 005-001 Great Transformations Deborah I Olszewski TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM This course explores the history and archaeology of the last 20,000 years from the development of agriculture to the industrial revolution. Why did people across the world abandon foraging for farming? How and why did cities and states develop? Why did societies succeed or fail? How have humans transformed themselves and the natural world, including the landscape and the climate? We will explore the methods that archaeologists use to consider these questions and analyze evidence for social and economic change from the Middle East, the Americas, Asia, Africa, Australia and Europe. In addition, students will have a chance to conduct hands-on exercises with artifacts from the Penn Museum during practicums. History & Tradition Sector (all classes) Objects-Based Learning Course https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ANTH005001
ANTH 022-401 World Musics & Cultures James Sykes TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. Fulfills College Cross Cultural Foundational Requirement. AFRC050401, MUSC050401 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes)
ANTH 022-402 World Musics & Cultures Maria Adriana Castrillon Velasquez TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. Fulfills College Cross Cultural Foundational Requirement. AFRC050402, MUSC050402 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ANTH022402
ANTH 022-403 World Musics & Cultures Juliet Pascal Glazer TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. Fulfills College Cross Cultural Foundational Requirement. MUSC050403, AFRC050403 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ANTH022403
ANTH 024-301 Archaeology in Pop Culture Douglas K. Smit TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Archaeology often captures the popular imagination through fantastic and farfetched portrayals of lost civilizations, aliens, and spectacular treasures. While these depictions of archaeology and the past may not be accurate, the story being told is nonetheless significant and reflects something about the culture that produced it. This course explores how these films, televisions shows, books, and video games tell stories about the past, what stories are being told, and what these representations imply about the relationship between archaeology and modern society. We will critically analyze popular representations of archaeology, comparing how competing visions of science and population science, fact and fiction, operate in the public sphere. By the end of the semester, you'll be able to: explain what archaeologists do and why; understand how archaeology and popular culture interact, how archaeology is portrayed in popular media, and how the public impacts archaeological research; to foster critical thinking skills and evaluate how science is communicated to the public; understand the relationship between the archaeological study of the past and the politics of the present. Course is available to Freshmen.
Freshman Seminar
For Freshmen Only
Objects-Based Learning Course
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ANTH024301
ANTH 033-001 Language, Society, and the Human Experience Andrew M. Carruthers TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Anthropology is the study of what it means to be human across space and time. In this introductory course, we explore how language is at the heart of what it means to be human, examining the constituting role of language in the human experience in societies across the globe. We address a number of questions: How is being a speaker being a member of a society? How do ways of speaking about the world shape ways of experiencing the world? What is linguistic diversity and why is it important? How does one's identity emerge through one's way of speaking? How are large-scale forces like globalization shaping languages and fashions of speaking around the world? Throughout, we explore how language reflects and shapes the ways in which human beings navigate the flux of everyday life.
ANTH 056-401 Seeing/Hearing Globally Carol Ann Muller F 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Students are provided a general introduction to a country's history, politics, environment, and performance through a range of resources: scholarly literature, film, music, and online resources; with particular focus on sites, communities, and events included in the 12 day intensive travel to that country (either Fall semester Intro with winter break travel; or spring semester Intro with late spring intensive travel). Students are given guidelines for writing about and representing live performances and experiences of exhibits and heritage sites for journaling and are expected to produce a written/creative project at the end of the travel. The itinerary and specific course content will vary according to the travel site and focus of each class. AFRC056401, MUSC056401, COML056401 Permission Needed From Instructor
Penn Global Seminar
ANTH 060-301 Cultures of Science and Technology Adriana Petryna W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Science and technology figure centrally in the economic, political, and socio-cultural changes that impact our worlds. Happenings in the life sciences, including the discovery of new genes, pathways, and processes, are redrawing concepts of the body and human nature and refiguring social and political relations. The seminar starts from the premise that scientific facts are made, not things existing a priori in the world and that are merely picked up by researchers and consumed by lay audiences. Likewise, technologies are created through a process of intense negotiation between producers and their sophisticated users. Focusing on the biosciences, we explore the production of science and technology and how they 1)affect individuals, self-identities, subjectivity, kinship, and social relationships; 2)have interacted with or reinforced political programs, racial classifications, unequal access to knowledge, and patterns of social injustice; 3)inform contemporary institutional structures, strategies of governance, and practices of citizenship. We will combine methods and perspectives from social and cultural anthropology, and the social studies of science and technology, and will draw from historical case studies, documentary films and media reports. Course is available to Freshmen.
Freshman Seminar
For Freshmen Only
ANTH 063-401 East/West:Mdrn Wrld Hist MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Sugar and Spices. Tea and Coffee. Opium and Cocaine. Hop aboard the Indian Ocean dhows, Chinese junks, Dutch schooners, and British and American clipper ships that made possible the rise of global capitalism, new colonial relationships, and the intensified forms of cultural change. How have the desires to possess and consume particular commodities shaped cultures and the course of modern history? This class introduces students to the cultural history of the modern world through an interdisciplinary analysis of connections between East and West, South and North. Following the circulation of commodities and the development of modern capitalism, the course examines the impact of global exchange on interactions and relationships between regions, nations, cultures, and peoples and the influences on cultural practices and meanings. The role of slavery and labor migrations, colonial and imperial relations, and struggles for economic and political independence are also considered. From the role of spices in the formation of European joint stock companies circa 1600 to the contemporary cocaine trade, the course's use of both original primary sources and secondary readings written by historians and anthropologists will enable particular attention to the ways that global trade has impacted social, cultural, and political formations and practices throughout the world. SAST063401 Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) Humanities & Social Science Sector
ANTH 093-401 Latinx Environmental Justice Teresa Gimenez MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM
T 02:00 PM-05:00 PM
This course explores the involvement of the Latinx environmental justice movement since the 1960s. It addresses theories and concepts of environmental racism and environmental justice, underscoring how Latinx have challenged, expanded, and contributed to the environmental justice discourse. In this course, students will explore national case studies of environmental and racial injustice as they bear on Latinx communities both in rural areas and in urban barrios throughout the United States. The course will analyze these case studies through the lens of Latinx artistic and literary texts (essays, paintings, short stories, documentaries, and short films) as they provide a unique historic and multicultural perspective of the Latinx experience with environmental injustice and of how Latinxs imagine alternative transitions and responses to environmental marginalization. In addition, the works of Latinx artists and writers will serve as case studies to deconstruct racial stereotypes of Latinxs as unconcerned about environmental issues, shedding light on how they share a broad engagement with environmental ideas. The case studies analyzed in this course emphasize race and class differences between farmworkers and urban barrio residents and how they affect their respective struggles. The unit on farmworkers will focus on workplace health issues such as toxic chemicals and collective bargaining contracts. The unit on urban barrios will focus on gentrification, affordable housing, and toxic substances in the home. We will also review current and past programs that have been organized to address the aforementioned problems. This is an Academically Based Community Service Course (ABCS course) through which students will learn from and provide support to a Latinx-serving organization in the City of Philadelphia on preventing exposure to hazardous substances, thus bridging the information gap on environmental justice issues in the Latinx community in Philadelphia. Information dissemination and education efforts will be conducted by collaborating with Esperanza Academy Charter School in Philadelphia to implement lessons on preventing exposure to hazardous substances. Studying environmental justice and pairing it with community service will heighten students' awareness of the complexities of culture, race, gender, and class while providing them with an invaluable experience of cross-cultural understanding. ENVS093401, URBS093401, LALS093401, SPAN093401 An Academically Based Community Serv Course
ANTH 107-401 The City in South Asia Indivar Jonnalagadda MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM This interdisciplinary social science course examines key topics, themes, and analytic methods in the study of South Asia by focusing on significant South Asian cities. With one-fifth of the worlds population,South Asia and its urban centers are playing an increasingly important role in recent global economic transformations, resulting in fundamental changes within both the subcontinent and the larger world. Drawing primarily on ethnographic studies of South Asia in the context of rapid historical change, the course also incorporates research drawn from urban studies, architecture, political science, and history, as well as fiction and film. SAST002401, URBS122401 Society sector (all classes) Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
ANTH 112-401 Sacred Stuff Donovan O. Schaefer TR 05:15 PM-06:45 PM Does religion start with what's in our heads? Or are religious commitments made, shaped and strengthened by the people, places, and things around us? This course will explore how religion happens in the material world. We'll start with classical and contemporary theories on the relationship of religion to stuff. We'll then consider examples of how religion is animated not just by texts, but through interactions with objects, spaces, bodies, monuments, color, design, architecture, and film. We'll ask how these material expressions of religion move beyond private faith and connect religion to politics and identity. RELS102401, ARTH339401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ANTH112401
ANTH 120-401 Popular Culture and Youth in Africa Adewale Adebanwi MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM All across the continent, Africa is alive with the energies of young people, expressed in music, art, fashion, drama, video, poetry, protest, and urban legends. In this course, we take a close look at the wide variety of popular forms produced and consumed by young people in a diversity of contexts, urban and rural, elite and marginal, mainstream and transgressive. We will examine how popular culture draws from African tradition to craft innovative versions of modernity and futurity. We will explore themes of democracy, inequality, and social justice threaded through popular genres as well as experiences of joy, anger, fear, and hilarity. We will see how popular culture provides escape and entertainment for young people while also working to transform African societies. AFRC122401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ANTH120401
ANTH 121-401 Origin & Cultr of Cities Richard L Zettler TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM The UN estimates that 2.9 of the world's 6.1 billion people live in cities and that this percentage is rapidly increasing in many parts of the world. This course examines urban life and urban problems by providing anthropological perspectives on this distinctive form of human association and land use. First we will examine the "origin" of cities, focusing on several of the places where cities first developed, including Mesopotamia and the Valley of Mexico. We will then investigate the internal structure of non-industrial cities by looking at case studies from around the world and from connections between the cities of the past and the city in which we live and work today. NELC103401, URBS121401 History & Tradition Sector (all classes)
ANTH 123-301 Communication & Culture Asif Agha MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM The course looks at varieties of human expression -- such as art, film, language and song -- as communicative practices that connect persons together to form a common culture. Discussion is centered around particular case studies and ethnographic examples. Examination of communicative practices in terms of the types of expressive signs they employ, their capacity to formulate and transmit cultural beliefs and ideals (such as conceptions of politics, nature, and self), and to define the size and characteristics of groups and communities sharing such ideals. Discussion of the role of media, social institutions, and technologies of communication (print, electronic). Emphasis on contemporary communicative practices and the forms of culture that emerge in the modern world. Society sector (all classes)
ANTH 143-001 Explorations in Human Biology Theodore G Schurr MW 01:45 PM-02:45 PM This course is an exploration of human biology from a biocultural and evolutionary perspective. The class will provide you with a better understanding of what it means to be human, how humans came to exhibit such a wide range variation, and what biological anthropology can contribute to your understanding of the world. In this class students will learn to integrate the theory and methods used in human biology research through lectures, assignments, and lab sessions. This course will explore topics including human genetics, growth and development, nutrition, disease, and reproduction. We will also use the course as an opportunity to introduce you to the important contributions of biological anthropologists to the study of race, inequality, sex and gender, and health among others. Nat Sci & Math Sector (new curriculum only) Natural Science & Math Sector
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
ANTH 161-401 Humans and the Earth System Melissa Brown Goodall
Joseph S Francisco
Kathleen D. Morrison
W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM As our planet's climate changes, it is imperative to understand the basic structures of the earth system and our connections to these, past, present, and future. The goal of this course is to help students develop an integrated understanding of climate change, linking the fundamental science - from the microscopic to the global scale - to human actions and possible futures. This team-taught course brings together approaches from environmental science, social sciences, history, and policy. Beyond providing basic climate and environmental literacy, we will also explore current and projected impacts of change, including changes to human life and biodiversity as well as other physical and biological systems. The complexity and significance of planetary change demands new ways of thinking and new approaches that transcend traditional boundaries; for that reason the course will be co-taught by instructors from the natural sciences (Joseph Francisco), social science and humanities (Kathleen Morrison), and policy (Melissa Brown Goodall). We will use the foundation provided by the two first parts of the course to address potential responses and solutions to the current crisis. The course will be divided into three units: 1. Science: what are the chemical and physical drivers of our changing climate, and what are the biological, health and environmental implications so far. 2. Impacts: how human activity has affected environments and climate so far and how climate change is currently impacting society, nature, agriculture, health, cities, and the most vulnerable communities. 3. Solutions: the roles of policy, business, agriculture, planning, and personal choices. The course is open to undergraduate students of all disciplines. While the reading and weekly assignments will be specific to the module, students may define a capstone project that reflects their academic interests. ENVS102401
ANTH 179-401 Performing Parables: Ragas and Sagas of Sundarban Brooke K. O'Harra MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM In this course writer Amitav Ghosh invites Penn students to engage his ongoing collaboration with the musician/performer Ali Sethi to stage his newest book Jungle Nama. Ghosh's book Jungle Nama employs dwipdipoyar verse form and the popular folk tale of Bon Bibi the guardian spirit of the Sundarban to address the eroding ecosystem of the Sundarban. In this course students will work in a short intensive collaborative process with the artists to realize a lyric and musical performance of Jungle Nama. The class employs both academic research and performance methodologies to guide students through histories of traditional Indian performance and folk takes and a thorough examination of Ghosh's source materials and influences (including studies of the Sundarban and its ecostystem). The course is co-taught with Director Brooke O'Harra. O'Harra, Ghosh and Sethi will lead students in a rigorous process of research, development and rehearsal, culminating in a public performance of a musical version of Jungle Nama. All levels and experience are welcome. Performance roles will be cast based on individual interests. In addition to performance roles, students will assume responsibility for other aspects of the process and production. In advance of registration, students are asked to audition and/or interview for the course depending upon initial interest. Actors, singers, dancers, musicians, artists and scholars are all encouraged to apply. Course specifics: The course will run until March 3 with an intensive 4-week rehearsal and development period that culminates in a live performance. Space is limited. Permission required. FNAR149401, SAST179401, ENGL149401, THAR253401
ANTH 207-401 Primate Behavior and Ecology Caitlin A. O'Connell TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM This course explores the behavior of wild primates and the ecological models that attempt to explain the evolution of these behaviors. The evolution and taxonomy of primates will be reviewed, followed by a brief history of wild primate studies. We will then explore primate behavior through theoretical frameworks ranging from socioecological theory to sexual selection. Topics discussed include, but are not limited to, socioecology, aggression, kinship, cooperation, reproductive strategies, cognition, and conservation. Those enrolled in 507 will have additional responsibilities assigned. Prerequisite: If course requirement not met, permission of instructor required. Undergraduates that would like to enroll at the 500 level need consent of instructor. ANTH507401
ANTH 209-401 Indigenous Communities and Community Museums: Directions For the Future Richard M Leventhal M 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Community museums are becoming more commonplace within indigenous communities throughout the Americas. These museums are created internally, by and for communities, as a way of framing self-identity and representation. The development of these museums is focused upon the need to define and highlight identity and differences between indigenous communities and the surrounding world. These community museums contrast dramatically with other cultural museums where the stories and histories of groups tend to be controlled by the nation-state and professional curators. This course will focus on the nature of indigenous communities, cultural representation, and identity with a focus upon the modern Maya communities of southern Belize. In addition, museums and community museums, world-wide, will be examined and analyzed. What are the different models of community museums and what is the process for the development of such museums? Is the only de-colonized museum one created and framed within and by the community? Seminar format with weekly discussions, readings, and a final research paper. There are no pre-requisites for this course and a background in anthropology is not required. This course will be connected to a community museum project in Indian Creek, Belize where travel and work will be initiated over the summer of 2021. This course is recommended but not required for participation in summer research program in Belize LALS210401
ANTH 219-301 Archaeology in the City of Brotherly Love Douglas K. Smit
Megan Crandal Kassabaum
F 10:00 AM-05:00 PM This course introduces the archaeology of Philadelphia and the surrounding area through guided visits to local prehistoric and historic sites, accompanied by readings, discussions, and guest lectures. This is an experiential course, in that students will explore local archaeological sites, both well known and rarely discussed, in person. Moving beyond reading the histories of places like Eastern State Penitentiary, the President's House, or Sycamore Mills, students will engage with social scientific analysis of the material culture and landscape features that remain in the archaeological record. This course is open to all undergraduates, no previous archaeological experience is required. The course will be held Fridays from 10am - 5pm including travel time to the sites and back to the Penn Museum, transportation provided by the university. Enrollment is limited so permission of the instructor is required. Course may be repeated for credit. Permission Needed From Instructor https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ANTH219301
ANTH 236-401 Iraq:Anc Cities& Empires Richard L Zettler W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Iraq: Ancient Cities and Empires is a chronological survey of the ancient civilization that existed in the drainage basin of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers from the early settled village farming communities of the 7th millennium BCE to the middle of the 1st millennium BCE, when Nebuchadnezzar II ruled Babylon and much of the Middle East. Though organized period by period, NELC 241 explores various social, political, economic, and ideological topics, exposing students to various strands of evidence, including settlement survey data, excavated architectural remains, artifacts, and documentary sources, as well as an eclectic mix of theoretical perspectives. The course aims to provide students with a strong foundation for the further study of the ancient and pre-modern Middle East. NELC641401, URBS236401, ANTH636401, NELC241401
ANTH 262-401 Anarchism Kristen R Ghodsee TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM "That we are Utopians is well known. So Utopian are we that we go the length of believing that the Revolution can and ought to assure shelter, food, and clothes to all..." -Pyotr Kropotkin, The Conquest of Bread. Although born in the West through the works of William Godwin and Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, anarchism as a political theory was subsequently developed by a variety of Russian and Ukrainian theorists and activists, including Mikhail Bakunin, Lev Tolstoy, Pyotr Kropotkin, Nestor Makhno, and Emma Goldman (in exile in the United States). Anarchism fundamentally questions the need for political power and authority, particularly as embodied in a state. As a political theory, anarchism makes moral claims about the importance of individual liberty and presents a positive theory of human flourishing that is based on ideals of non-coercive consensus building. This course investigates the 19th century theoretical foundations of Russian and Ukrainian anarchist theory through a close examination of key texts from the 19th and early 20th centuries and includes ethnographic explorations of anarchist practices in eastern Europe in the 21st century. All readings will be in English. REES162401, REES662401
ANTH 267-401 Living World in Archaeological Science Katherine M Moore
Chantel E. White
TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM By focusing on the scientific analysis of archaeological remains, this course will explore life and death in the past. It takes place in the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and is team taught in three modules: human skeletal analysis, analysis of animal remains, and analysis of plant remains. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how organic materials provide key information about past environments, human behavior, and cultural change through discussions of topics such as health and disease, inequality, and food. ANTH567401, CLST268401, CLST568401, NELC286401, NELC586401 Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
Objects-Based Learning Course
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ANTH267401
ANTH 268-301 Anthropology of Museums Margaret M. Bruchac W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This course examines museums as sites where issues of Indigenous identity, memory, place and power intersect. Museums have long been engaged in the selective preservation, representation, and contextualization of Indigenous objects, cultures, and histories. We will examine antiquarian impulses that inspired the collecting of curiosities, scientific studies that drove the collection of biological specimens, and nationalist ideals that shaped monuments to house imperialist memories. Museums are now sites for complex, often contentious discourse around Indigenous collections. Students will review histories of local and national collecting processes, with a particular focus on Native American collections and concerns. We will also consider how Indigenous curators and new kinds of museums have developed innovative displays and interpretations. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ANTH268301
ANTH 273-601 Global Health: Anthropological Perspectives Michael B Joiner W 05:15 PM-08:15 PM In some parts of the world spending on pharmaceuticals is astronomical. In others, people struggle for survival amid new and reemerging epidemics and have little or no access to basic or life-saving therapies. Treatments for infectious diseases that disproportionately affect the world's poor remain under-researched and global health disparities are increasing. This interdisciplinary seminar integrates perspectives from the social sciences and the biomedical sciences to explore 1) the development and global flows of medical technologies; 2) how the health of individuals and groups is affected by medical technologies, public policy, and the forces of globalization as each of these impacts local worlds. The seminar is structured to allow us to examine specific case material from around the world (Haiti, South Africa, Brazil, Russia, China, India, for example), and to address the ways in which social, political-economic, and technological factors -- which are increasingly global in nature -- influence basic biological mechanisms and disease outcomes and distribution. As we analyze each case and gain familiarity with ethnographic methods, we will ask how more effective interventions can be formulated. The course draws from historical and ethnographic accounts, medical journals, ethical analyses, and films, and familiarizes students with critical debates on globalization and with local responses to globalizing processes. HSOC239601
ANTH 310-401 Transdisciplinary Environmental Humanities Marilyn Howarth CANCELED Emergent transdisciplinary fields, such as the environmental humanities, reflect a growing awareness that responses to contemporary environmental dilemmas require the collaborative work of not only diverse scientists, medical practitioners, and engineers, but also more expansive publics, including artists, urban and rural communities, social scientists, and legal fields. This course is inspired by the need to attend to environmental challenges, and their health, justice, and knowledge production implications, as inherently social concerns. The class is co-taught by faculty from the School of Arts and Sciences and the School of Medicine, and will address the challenges and possibilities of working across disciplinary boundaries, building collaborative affinities, and negotiating frictions between diverse methodologies and epistemological approaches. Dr. Kristina Lyons from the Department of Anthropology brings years of experience collaborating with soil scientists, small farmers, indigenous communities, lawyers, and judges in Colombia on watershed restoration projects, soil degradation, toxicity, and the implementation of socio-ecological justice. Dr. Marilyn Howarth is a medical doctor from the Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology of the School of Medicine and has experience engaging the public, legislators and regulators around environmental health issues affecting the quality of air, water, soil and consumer products. Through their different lenses, they will foster interdisciplinary environmental collaboration and scholarship by engaging students in discussions and research that bring together the arts and sciences regarding issues of urban air pollution, soil remediation, deforestation, and water contamination, among other environmental health problems. This inaugural course seeks to explore environmental humanities on the global scale. Using Dr. Lyons' deep insight and valuable connections to communities in Colombia, we will explore the experience of environmental degradation, opportunities and challenges for mitigation, and socio-environmental health implications there while placing these issues in conversation with U.S. public health, regulatory and political frameworks and community experiences on similar issues. A comparative exploration of environmental justice in both Colombia and the U.S. will be infused into much of the discussion. This class offers a unique opportunity for students from engineering, natural and social sciences, humanities and the arts to learn to converse and collaborate around pressing socio-environmental and public health issues. LALS310401
ANTH 311-401 Disaster Anc World Lauren M Ristvet
Campbell A. Grey
MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM Disasters occupy a powerful place in our imagination. Stories of floods, plagues, earthquakes and storms excite and horrify us, and communities mobilize their resources quickly in response to these events. In the ancient Mediterranean world, disasters could take on potent meaning, indicating the anger or disfavor of the gods, acting as warnings against certain courses of action, or confirmations of individuals' fears or suspicions about the world in which they lived. In this course, we explore the evidence for some disasters in the ancient Mediterranean world, the ways in which contemporaries reacted to those disasters and interpreted their causes. This project is, of necessity, multidisciplinary, involving textual, archaeological, geological, and comparative materials and drawing on methodologies from history, political and archaeological science, and the emerging field of disaster studies. In the process, we will gain an appreciation of the social structures of communities in the period, the thought-world in which they operated, and the challenges and opportunities that attend a project of this sort. No prior knowledge of Ancient History is required, although it would be useful to have taken an introductory survey course. Texts will be discussed in translation. ANCH311401, CLST311401
ANTH 327-401 Dispossession & Territorial Recovery Among Indigenous Peoples in S. America Daniela Fernandes Alarcon W 08:30 AM-11:30 AM This seminar will focus on contemporary dynamics of dispossession, territorial claims and territorial recovery involving indigenous peoples in South America. Drawing on cases from different countries (particularly from Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Bolivia and Colombia), we will examine, in historical perspective, processes of territorial dispossession, socio-environmental conflicts, collective action, and struggles for territorial recovery and recognition set against the policies of settler colonial nation-states and economic activities that tend to evict people from their lands. More specifically, we will focus on actions carried out by indigenous peoples and movements to fight territorial dispossession, recover and protect their lands. Particular attention will be paid to the period marked by the growing visibility of the indigenous movements in South America, from 1970s to the present. The perspectives and strategies of indigenous peoples and movements regarding their territorial rights and projects of living well will be considered within the broader framework of identity, ethnicity and land issues. In that sense, the course will draw connections to the actions carried out by landless peasants and other groups. By devoting our attention to different contexts through the region, we will be able both to understand specific situations and identify underlying dynamics. LALS326401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ANTH327401
ANTH 329-401 Psychoanalytic and Anthropological Perspectives On Childhood Barbara Shapiro
Lawrence Blum
T 03:30 PM-06:30 PM How do people become who they are, both similar to others and uniquely individual? How might these similarities and differences be shaped by childhood experiences in family, community, and societies around the world? How do children develop emotionally? Morally? What features of human development, expression of emotions, and relational patterns are universal for our species? What features are not universal? And what is and is not known about these questions? In this course, we will consider these and many other questions. We will read about and discuss complex and dynamic interactions between culture and individual psychology, and between nature and nurture from birth to adulthood. We will carefully examine various phases of human development as described by psychoanalysts and anthropologists. The course includes anthropologic and psychoanalytic readings and videotapes, as well as literature, fairy tales, and mythologies from cultures around the world. The instructors are both psychoanalysts, one a psychiatrist and one a pediatrician. The course counts towards the Psychoanalytic Studies (PSYS) Minor. ANTH529401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ANTH329401
ANTH 334-401 Sighting Black Girlhood (SNF Paideia Program Course) Deborah A Thomas
Grace Louise B Sanders Johnson
T 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This course will investigate the relationships among women, gender, sexuality, and anthropological research. We will begin by exploring the trajectory of research interest in women and gender, drawing first from the early work on gender and sex by anthropologists like Margaret Mead and Ruth Benedict; moving through the 1970s and 1980s arguments about gender, culture, and political economy; arriving at more current concerns with gender, race, sexuality, and empire. For the rest of the semester, we will critically read contemporary ethnographies addressing pressing issues such as nationalism, militarism, neoliberalism and fundamentalism. Throughout, we will investigate what it means not only to "write women's worlds", but also to analyze broader socio-cultural, political, and economic processes through a gendered lens. We will, finally, address the various ways feminist anthropology fundamentally challenged the discipline's epistemological certainties, as well as how it continues to transform our understanding of the foundations of the modern world. Prerequisite: Should have some functional knowledge of Cultural Anthropology. ANTH634401, AFRC334401, AFRC634401 Permission Needed From Instructor
Designated SNF Paideia Program Course
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ANTH334401
ANTH 342-401 Dress and Fashion in Africa Ali B. Ali-Dinar TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Throughout Africa, social and cultural identities of ethnicity, gender, generation, rank and status were conveyed in a range of personal ornamentation that reflects the variation of African cultures. The meaning of one particular item of clothing can transform completely when moved across time and space. As one of many forms of expressive culture, dress shape and give forms to social bodies. In the study of dress and fashion, we could note two distinct broad approaches, the historical and the anthropological. While the former focuses on fashion as a western system that shifted across time and space, and linked with capitalism and western modernity; the latter approach defines dress as an assemblage of modification the body. The Africanist proponents of this anthropological approach insisted that fashion is not a dress system specific to the west and not tied with the rise of capitalism. This course will focus on studying the history of African dress by discussing the forces that have impacted and influenced it overtime, such as socio-economic, colonialism, religion, aesthetics, politics, globalization, and popular culture. The course will also discuss the significance of the different contexts that impacted the choices of what constitute an appropriate attire for distinct situations. African dress in this context is not a fixed relic from the past, but a live cultural item that is influenced by the surrounding forces. AFRC324401, ARTH324401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ANTH342401
ANTH 359-401 Nutritional Anthropology Caitlin A. O'Connell TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM The course is an introduction to nutritional anthropology, an area of anthropology concerned with human nutrition and food systems in social, cultural and historical contexts. On the one hand, nutritional anthropologists study the significance of the food quest in terms of survival and health. On the other hand, they also know that people eat food for a variety of reasons that may have little, if anything, to do with nutrition, health, or survival. While the availability of food is dependent upon the physical environment, food production systems, and economic resources, food choice and the strategies human groups employ to gain access to and distribute food are deeply embedded in specific cultural patterns, social relationships, and political and economic systems. Thus, nutritional anthropology represents the interface between anthropology and the nutritional sciences, and as such, can provide powerful insights into the interactions of social and biological factors in the context of the nutritional health of individuals and populations. Because food and nutrition are quintessential biocultural issues, the course takes a biocultural approach drawing on perspectives from biological, socio-cultural and political-economic anthropology. Course content will include: a discussion of approaches to nutritional anthropology; basics of human nutrition; food systems, food behaviors and ideas; methods of dietary and nutritional assessment; and a series of case studies addressing causes and consequences to nutritional problems across the world. LALS359401, URBS359401
ANTH 393-401 Latinx Environmental Justice Teresa Gimenez MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM
T 02:00 PM-05:00 PM
This course explores the involvement of the Latinx environmental justice movement since the 1960s. It addresses theories and concepts of environmental racism and environmental justice, underscoring how Latinx have challenged, expanded, and contributed to the environmental justice discourse. In this course, students will explore national case studies of environmental and racial injustice as they bear on Latinx communities both in rural areas and in urban barrios throughout the United States. The course will analyze these case studies through the lens of Latinx artistic and literary texts (essays, paintings, short stories, documentaries, and short films) as they provide a unique historic and multicultural perspective of the Latinx experience with environmental injustice and of how Latinxs imagine alternative transitions and responses to environmental marginalization. In addition, the works of Latinx artists and writers will serve as case studies to deconstruct racial stereotypes of Latinxs as unconcerned about environmental issues, shedding light on how they share a broad engagement with environmental ideas. The case studies analyzed in this course emphasize race and class differences between farmworkers and urban barrio residents and how they affect their respective struggles. The unit on farmworkers will focus on workplace health issues such as toxic chemicals and collective bargaining contracts. The unit on urban barrios will focus on gentrification, affordable housing, and toxic substances in the home. We will also review current and past programs that have been organized to address the aforementioned problems. This is an Academically Based Community Service Course (ABCS course) through which students will learn from and provide support to a Latinx-serving organization in the City of Philadelphia on preventing exposure to hazardous substances, thus bridging the information gap on environmental justice issues in the Latinx community in Philadelphia. Information dissemination and education efforts will be conducted by collaborating with Esperanza Academy Charter School in Philadelphia to implement lessons on preventing exposure to hazardous substances. Studying environmental justice and pairing it with community service will heighten students' awareness of the complexities of culture, race, gender, and class while providing them with an invaluable experience of cross-cultural understanding. ENVS393401, URBS393401, LALS393401, SPAN393401 An Academically Based Community Serv Course
ANTH 397-401 Contemporary Artists in Conversation: Reckoning and Repair Alissa M. Jordan MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM In this project-based learning course, students will develop skills in interviewing, oral history, and podcast production by hosting a series of conversations with visiting contemporary artists including participating artists in the transformative, multi-site exhibit, "Rising Sun-Artists and an Uncertain America" (a Spring 2022 collaboration between the Philadelphia Academy of Fine Arts and the African American Museum of Philadelphia). Following the exhibit plan, this course focuses thematically on how these contemporary artists tackle the "disquieting canonical history of the United States", and how their diverse practices speak to the "re-appraisal, reformation, reckoning, and repair necessary to find a collective way forward" at this critical social moment. This course considers contemporary art as a complementary method of scholarship to ethnography, giving students hands on-experience in exploring how conversations between art and anthropology can open up avenues for collaborative, ethical, and engaged scholarship. This course is designed to be fruitful for students with all levels of experience, including beginners with little prior podcasting/media experience. Students will be tasked with conducting ethnographic oral histories in interviews with artists, but also attending to the specific assumptions and conventions of representation that artists use, and the way they intervene into social challenges of reckoning and repair in their practice. ANTH597401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ANTH397401
ANTH 415-001 Archaeology of Animals Katherine M Moore TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This course introduces the study of animal bones from archaeological sites. Faunal analysis is an interdisciplinary science which draws methods from archaeology, biology, and paleontology. Bones, shells, and other remains yield evidence for the use of animals by humans, and evidence for the biology of animals and for past environments. The course will focus on research approaches to important transitions in human-animal relationships: the development of human hunting and fishing, animal domestication, early pastoralism, and the emergence of market economies in animal products. Class presentations will include lectures and discussion concerning research design and archaeological case material, with additional videos, slidework with field and laboratory equipment, and supervised work identifying and describing archaeological materials from the University Museum's collections. This class is taught in the Zooarchaeology Laboratory of the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ANTH415001
ANTH 507-401 Primate Behavior and Ecology Caitlin A. O'Connell TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM This course explores the behavior of wild primates and the ecological models that attempt to explain the evolution of these behaviors. The evolution and taxonomy of primates will be reviewed, followed by a brief history of wild primate studies. We will then explore primate behavior through theoretical frameworks ranging from socioecological theory to sexual selection. Topics discussed include, but are not limited to, socioecology, aggression, kinship, cooperation, reproductive strategies, cognition, and conservation. Those enrolled in 507 will have additional responsibilities assigned. Prerequisite: If course requisite not met, permission of instructor required. Undergraduates that would like to enroll at the 500 level need consent of instructor. ANTH207401 Undergraduates Need Permission
ANTH 514-401 Petrography of Cultural Materials Marie-Claude Boileau W 10:15 AM-01:15 PM Introduction to thin-section petrography of stone and ceramic archaeological materials. Using polarized light microscopy, the first half of this course will cover the basics of mineralogy and the petrography of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. The second half will focus on the petrographic description of ceramic materials, mainly pottery, with emphasis on the interpretation of provenance and technology. As part of this course, students will characterize and analyze archaeological samples from various collections. Prior knowledge of geology is not required. AAMW512401, CLST512401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ANTH514401
ANTH 516-401 Public Interest Workshop Gretchen E L Suess R 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This is a Public Interest Ethnography workshop (originally created by Peggy Reeves Sanday - Department of Anthropology) that incorporates an interdisciplinary approach to exploring social issues. Open to graduate and advanced undergraduate students, the workshop is a response to Amy Gutmann's call for interdisciplinary cooperation across the University and to the Department of Anthropology's commitment to developing public interest research and practice as a disciplinary theme. Rooted in the rubric of public interest social science, the course focuses on: 1) merging problem solving with theory and analysis in the interest of change motivated by a commitment to social justice, racial harmony, equality, and human rights; and 2) engaging in public debate on human issues to make research results accessible to a broader audience. The workshop brings in guest speakers and will incorporate original ethnographic research to merge theory with action. Students are encouraged to apply the framing model to a public interest research and action topic of their choice. This is an academically-based-community-service (ABCS) course that partners directly with Penn's Netter Center for Community Partnerships. GSWS516401, URBS516401 An Academically Based Community Serv Course
ANTH 529-401 Psychoanalytic and Anthropological Perspectives On Childhood Barbara Shapiro
Lawrence Blum
T 03:30 PM-06:30 PM How do people become who they are, both similar to others and uniquely individual? How might these similarities and differences be shaped by childhood experiences in family, community, and societies around the world? How do children develop emotionally? Morally? What features of human development, expression of emotions, and relational patterns are universal for our species? What features are not universal? And what is and is not known about these questions? In this course, we will consider these and many other questions. We will read about and discuss complex and dynamic interactions between culture and individual psychology, and between nature and nurture from birth to adulthood. We will carefully examine various phases of human development as described by psychoanalysts and anthropologists. The course includes anthropologic and psychoanalytic readings and videotapes, as well as literature, fairy tales, and mythologies from cultures around the world. The instructors are both psychoanalysts, one a psychiatrist and one a pediatrician. The course counts towards the Psychoanalytic Studies (PSYS) Minor. ANTH329401 Undergraduates Need Permission https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ANTH529401
ANTH 532-301 Medico-Political Anthropology Adriana Petryna M 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This seminar explores critical intersections between medical and political anthropology. Prompted by long-standing realities erupting during the COVID-19 pandemic and ongoing protests against racial injustice, it tracks relations of power in and beyond medicine's walls, and where medicine is intimately embedded in institutions linked to human rights, carceral detention and immigration, reproductive controls, and pandemic biocontainments. Within changing global political orders, we will also probe concepts of ethics and healing as decolonial strategies and in contexts of Indigenous, social, and environmental justice movements. Undergraduates Need Permission
ANTH 532-311 Medico-Political Anthropology CANCELED This seminar explores critical intersections between medical and political anthropology. Prompted by long-standing realities erupting during the COVID-19 pandemic and ongoing protests against racial injustice, it tracks relations of power in and beyond medicine's walls, and where medicine is intimately embedded in institutions linked to human rights, carceral detention and immigration, reproductive controls, and pandemic biocontainments. Within changing global political orders, we will also probe concepts of ethics and healing as decolonial strategies and in contexts of Indigenous, social, and environmental justice movements. Undergraduates Need Permission
ANTH 543-401 Public Enviro Humanities Bethany Wiggin W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This broadly interdisciplinary course is designed for Graduate and Undergraduate Fellows in the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities (PPEH) who hail from departments across Arts and Sciences as well as other schools at the university. The course is also open to others with permission of the instructors. Work in environmental humanities by necessity spans academic disciplines. By design, it can also address and engage publics beyond traditional academic settings. This seminar, with limited enrollment, explores best practices in public environmental humanities. Students receive close mentoring to develop and execute cross-disciplinary, public engagement projects on the environment. ENVS544401, COML562401, GRMN544401, URBS544401 Permission Needed From Instructor
ANTH 552-401 Archaeometallurgy Seminar F 08:30 AM-11:30 AM This course is designed to provide an in-depth analysis of archaeological metals. Topics to be discussed include: exploitation of ore and its transformation to metal in ancient times, distribution of metal as a raw materials, provenance studies, development and organization of early metallurgy, and interdisciplinary investigations of metals and related artifacts like slag and crucibles. Students will become familiar with the full spectrum of analytical procedures, ranging from microscopy for materials characterization to mass spectrometry for geochemical fingerprinting, and will work on individual research projects analyzing archaeological objects following the analytical methodology of archaeometallurgy. CLST552401, AAMW552401, NELC587401 Undergraduates Need Permission https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ANTH552401
ANTH 564-301 Colonial Ecologies Kathleen D. Morrison
Mark T Lycett
TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM This seminar explores the historical ecology of European colonial expansion in a comparative framework, concentrating on the production of "periphery" and the transformation of incorporated societies and environments. We begin with a discussion of the theoretical frameworks, sources of evidence, and analytical strategies employed by researchers to address the conjunction of environmental and human history in colonial contexts, including underdevelopment and global systems of circulation; political ecology; and ecological imperialism. We then discuss the circulation of persons, crops, invasives, and microbes as fundamental conditions of emerging global systems. Drawing on these elements, we discuss landscapes as sites of misrecognition, rationalization, and cultural production. This discussion sets the stage for an examination of novel forms of economic and ecological production, including the emergence of the 'drug foods', the transformation of forest products, and the rise of the plantation. We then consider the political ecology of crisis in colonial settings, including agrarian collapse, famine, and 'ecological poverty.' Undergraduates Need Permission https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ANTH564301
ANTH 567-401 Living World in Archaeological Science Katherine M Moore
Chantel E. White
TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM By focusing on the scientific analysis of archaeological remains, this course will explore life and death in the past. It takes place in the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and is team taught in three modules: human skeletal analysis, analysis of animal remains, and analysis of plant remains. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how organic materials provide key information about past environments, human behavior, and cultural change through discussions of topics such as health and disease, inequality, and food. ANTH267401, CLST268401, CLST568401, NELC286401, NELC586401 Undergraduates Need Permission
Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
Objects-Based Learning Course
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ANTH567401
ANTH 572-401 Geophysical Prospection For Archaeology Jason Herrmann W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Near-surface geophysical prospection methods are now widely used in archaeology as they allow archaeologists to rapidly map broad areas, minimize or avoid destructive excavation, and perceive physical dimensions of archaeological features that are outside of the range of human perception. This course will cover the theory of geophysical sensors commonly used in archaeological investigations and the methods for collecting, processing, and interpreting geophysical data from archaeological contexts. We will review the physical properties of common archaeological and paleoenvironmental targets, the processes that led to their deposition and formation, and how human activity is reflected in anomalies recorded through geophysical survey through lectures, readings, and discussion. Students will gain experience collecting data in the field with various sensors at archaeological sites in the region. A large proportion of the course will be computer-based as students work with data from geophysical sensors, focusing on the fundamentals of data processing, data fusion, and interpretation. Some familiarity with GIS is recommended. CLST572401, AAMW572401, NELC572401 Undergraduates Need Permission
An Academically Based Community Serv Course
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ANTH572401
ANTH 585-401 Ruins and Reconstruction Lynn M. Meskell W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This class examines our enduring fascination with ruins coupled with our commitments to reconstruction from theoretical, ethical, socio-political and practical perspectives. This includes analyzing international conventions and principles, to the work of heritage agencies and NGOs, to the implications for specific local communities and development trajectories. We will explore global case studies featuring archaeological and monumental sites with an attention to context and communities, as well as the construction of expertise and implications of international intervention. Issues of conservation from the material to the digital will also be examined. Throughout the course we will be asking what a future in ruins holds for a variety of fields and disciplines, as well as those who have most to win or lose in the preservation of the past. HSPV585401 Undergraduates Need Permission
ANTH 587-401 Race, Nation, Empire Deborah A Thomas W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This graduate seminar examines the dynamic relationships among empires, nations and states; colonial and post-colonial policies; and anti-colonial strategies within a changing global context. Using the rubrics of anthropology, history, cultural studies, and social theory, we will explore the intimacies of subject formation within imperial contexts- past and present- especially in relation to ideas about race and belonging. We will focus on how belonging and participation have been defined in particular locales, as well as how these notions have been socialized through a variety of institutional contexts. Finally, we will consider the relationships between popular culture and state formation, examining these as dialectical struggles for hegemony. LALS588401, GSWS587401, AFRC587401 Undergraduates Need Permission https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ANTH587401
ANTH 594-301 Indigenous Theory & Decolonizing Methodologies Margaret M. Bruchac TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course will delve into some of the innovative theoretical approaches and interpretations, rooted in long-standing Indigenous ontologies, that are emerging within the inter-disciplinary field of Native American and Indigenous Studies. Decolonial projects highlight Indigenous conceptions of materiality, kinship, and landscape, while also critically examining the impact of colonizing ideologies, and undoing antiquated and biased colonial settler interpretations. Students will learn practical methods for deploying Indigenous theory and decolonizing methodologies in diverse research settings. Course readings and interviews with Indigenous knowledge-keepers will feature innovative socio-cultural, ethnohistorical, museological, and archaeological research projects that emphasize processes of consultation and collaboration. Individual case studies will focus on: ecological knowledges; territorial sovereignty; community-based archaeological research; and the reclamation and preservation of cultural heritage. The goal is to understand how academic research can be more inclusive of, and more responsible to, Indigenous communities. Undergraduates Need Permission https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ANTH594301
ANTH 597-401 Contemporary Artists in Conversation: Reckoning and Repair Alissa M. Jordan MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM In this project-based learning course, students will develop skills in interviewing, oral history, and podcast production by hosting a series of conversations with visiting contemporary artists including participating artists in the transformative, multi-site exhibit, "Rising Sun-Artists and an Uncertain America" (a Spring 2022 collaboration between the Philadelphia Academy of Fine Arts and the African American Museum of Philadelphia). Following the exhibit plan, this course focuses thematically on how these contemporary artists tackle the "disquieting canonical history of the United States", and how their diverse practices speak to the "re-appraisal, reformation, reckoning, and repair necessary to find a collective way forward" at this critical social moment. This course considers contemporary art as a complementary method of scholarship to ethnography, giving students hands on-experience in exploring how conversations between art and anthropology can open up avenues for collaborative, ethical, and engaged scholarship. This course is designed to be fruitful for students with all levels of experience, including beginners with little prior podcasting/media experience. Students will be tasked with conducting ethnographic oral histories in interviews with artists, but also attending to the specific assumptions and conventions of representation that artists use, and the way they intervene into social challenges of reckoning and repair in their practice. ANTH397401 Undergraduates Need Permission https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ANTH597401
ANTH 619-640 Mla Proseminar: Cultural Diversity and Global Connections Kathleen D. Hall CANCELED This course considers the intensification of global connections and what anthropologist Anna Tsing has referred to as the "zones of awkward engagement" that emerge within the contemporary global capitalist order. Social problems, such as environmental change, the welfare of refugees, human rights abuses, or poverty in the Global South, have increasingly come to be seen as global issues best solved through multinational or international cooperation. Efforts to address these problems bring together diverse stakeholders, international experts, policy makers, politicians, civil servants, activists, international and local volunteers as well as local people, each interpreting "the problem" from different cultural perspectives and possessing varying degrees of power to affect change. Ethnographic analysis is particularly well suited to examining the diverse and conflicting social interactions, misunderstandings and multiple perspectives, cultural politics and power dynamics that arise locally within these zones of awkward engagement and that ultimately shape the outcomes of social change efforts. The course will emphasize the close and critical reading of ethnographic accounts of a range of social improvement efforts --environmentalist, human rights, refugee relief, and fair trade economic efforts-- across different regions of the world to gain a better understanding of how cultural diversity and power relations shape social interaction within these globalizes zones of awkward engagement. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the nature and practice of ethnographic research and of the challenges faced in engaging globally. Course Online: Synchronous Format
ANTH 634-401 Sighting Black Girlhood (SNF Paideia Program Course) Deborah A Thomas
Grace Louise B Sanders Johnson
T 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This course will investigate the relationships among women, gender, sexuality, and anthropological research. We will begin by exploring the trajectory of research interest in women and gender, drawing first from the early work on gender and sex by anthropologists like Margaret Mead and Ruth Benedict; moving through the 1970s and 1980s arguments about gender, culture, and political economy; arriving at more current concerns with gender, race, sexuality, and empire. For the rest of the semester, we will critically read contemporary ethnographies addressing pressing issues such as nationalism, militarism, neoliberalism and fundamentalism. Throughout, we will investigate what it means not only to "write women's worlds", but also to analyze broader socio-cultural, political, and economic processes through a gendered lens. We will, finally, address the various ways feminist anthropology fundamentally challenged the discipline's epistemological certainties, as well as how it continues to transform our understanding of the foundations of the modern world. Prerequisite: Should have some functional knowledge of Cultural Anthropology. ANTH334401, AFRC334401, AFRC634401 Permission Needed From Instructor
Designated SNF Paideia Program Course
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=ANTH634401
ANTH 636-401 Iraq:Anc Cities& Empires Richard L Zettler W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Iraq: Ancient Cities and Empires is a chronological survey of the ancient civilization that existed in the drainage basin of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers from the early settled village farming communities of the 7th millennium BCE to the middle of the 1st millennium BCE, when Nebuchadnezzar II ruled Babylon and much of the Middle East. Though organized period by period, NELC 241 explores various social, political, economic, and ideological topics, exposing students to various strands of evidence, including settlement survey data, excavated architectural remains, artifacts, and documentary sources, as well as an eclectic mix of theoretical perspectives. The course aims to provide students with a strong foundation for the further study of the ancient and pre-modern Middle East. NELC641401, URBS236401, ANTH236401, NELC241401 Undergraduates Need Permission
ANTH 642-301 Ethnographies in Linguistic Anthropology Andrew M. Carruthers F 10:15 AM-01:15 PM This course provides graduate students in linguistic anthropology and allied fields an opportunity for sustained, critical engagement with ethnographic monographs in linguistic and semiotic anthropology. Readings vary yearly, but run the gamut from the classical or 'canonical' to the contemporary or 'experimental.' Recurring concerns include: the nature of the ethnographic monograph as text-artifact; the presentation and exposition of ethnographic and linguistic particulars; questions of 'authorial voice'; and the registers, genres, and styles of ethnographic representation obtaining in the linguistic anthropological tradition. Undergraduates Need Permission
ANTH 653-301 Social Theory From Kant To Deleuze Asif Agha T 10:15 AM-01:15 PM The course examines the work of 20th century writers like Weber, Bourdieu, Foucault and Deleuze in the light of the intellectual traditions to which they belong, including the work of writers like Kant, Hegel, Marx, and Nietzsche. Particular attention is given to the philosophical roots of the models of society proposed by specific authors and the question of the applicability of such models to ethnographically based anthropological research. Undergraduates Need Permission